HST122-test2 - World War I, abroad I. Historical...

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World War I, abroad I. Historical perspective A. Continuity vs. Discontinuity 1. Continuity: American involvement in line with past foreign policy trends - Open door policy 2. Discontinuity: American involvement represented break with past a. First time troops fought in European War b. War brought economic, political, social (black, women) change at home II. Context of the War A. Triple Entente vs. Triple Alliance 1. Triple Entente: British, France, Russia 2. Triple Alliance: German, Austria, Hungary B. Timeline of the War 1. War begins: 1914 2. U.S. entry: 1917 3. War ends: 1918 III. Wilson’s Strategy A. Initial response: neutrality 1. Reason: to save lives, and to maintain trade B. Policy included desire to act as broker wanted “Wilsonianism” 1. Wanted free trade 2. Wanted democracy and “self-determination” IV. Obstacles to Wilson’s strategy A. Hatred of Allies B. Russian Revolution (major happening during the War) 1. 1 st revolution: liberal 2. 2 nd revolution: radical, worker, communist V. Resistance to War
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A. Peace Advocates included Insurgent Progressives reformers B. Seen in Congress 1. Resistance to Preparedness Campaign (prepare war: 1916) 2. War vote showed reluctance C. Populace at Large D. Radical groups: IWW, socialist party VI. Reasons for involvement A. Anglophiles in the Government Wilson B. Economic 1. Lobby from Corporations 2. Bank Loans to Allies C. Zimmermann Memo (to Mexico) created Anti-German Sentiment D. German Submarine Warfare 1. Direct threated to Neutrality Rights (trade) 2. Lusitania sank by German submarine (1915) 3. Unrestricted German Submarine Warfare (1917) VII. The U.S. in WWI A. Selective Service Act: 1917 B. American Expeditionary Force: 1917 C. American Involvement Critical for Allied Victory D. Build-up of American Military: No.1 position in Navy VIII. Wilson and the League Fight A. War aims during war, 14 points (1918) 1. First 5: open diplomacy, freedom of seas 2. Points 6~13: self-determination (boundary of Europe) 3. Point 14: League of Nations B. Changes to Wilson’s Plan 1. War reparations Demanded of Germany 2. Self-determination not always met
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3. Did not defeat Marxist-Socialist Threat 4. Tried to intervene in revolution, failed 5. League of Nations defeated in the U.S. C. The Defeat of the League 1. U.S. Senate did ratify the Treat of Paris 2. Irreconcilables and isolationists worked to defeat the Treaty 3. Needed support of mild reservationists (Republican) and democrats to pass it, but would not compromise 4. Separate peace with Germany: 1921 D. Effect of the war and the League fight on politics 1. Swing to the Right 2. Republicans in control of Congress and the presidency (3 times in low) World War I at Home I. Growth in Government Bureaucracy A. Government mobilized all sectors of the economy (100 of agency) B. Examples: Food agency (Herbert Hoover – make sure enough food for everyone) C. War Industries board: the most powerful in the world 1. Bernard Baruch: he chose who got the contract
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2011 for the course MGT 101 taught by Professor Karen during the Spring '11 term at Missouri State University-Springfield.

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HST122-test2 - World War I, abroad I. Historical...

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