ELISA lab exam - What does ELISA stand for? Enzyme-linked...

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What does ELISA stand for? E nzyme- l inked i mmuno s orbent a ssay Why are enzymes used in this immunoassay? Enzymes provide a way to see whether the primary antibody has attached to its target (antigen) in the microplate well. Primary and secondary antibodies are invisible, so a detection method is necessary. The enzyme HRP is linked to the second antibody. HRP reacts with a colorless substrate in a chemical reaction that turns blue. If the secondary antibody is present in the well, the blue color change indicates a positive result. Why do you need to assay positive and negative control samples as well as your own experimental samples? Controls are needed to make sure the experiment worked. if there are no positive controls and the sample is negative, we can’t know if the sample was truly negative or if the assay process didn’t work. Conversely, without a negative control, there is no way of knowing if all samples (positive or not) would have given a positive result. The samples that you added to the microplate strip contain many proteins and may
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ELISA lab exam - What does ELISA stand for? Enzyme-linked...

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