Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers13

Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers13 -...

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1 n Meteorologists and aeronautical engineers have defined a  “standard atmosphere” that represents the approximate average of  all observations, day and night, summer and winter. n This average of observed temperatures is compared in Fig. 5.5  (next slide) with the adiabatic lapse rate.  The lapse rate in the standard atmosphere is 6.49 oC/km, about  66% of the adiabatic lapse rate.
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3 n The temperature does not continue to decrease with  increasing height in the stratosphere because at that 
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Unformatted text preview: elevation some chemical reactions occur that absorb energy from the sun. 4 n The atmosphere is practically transparent to visible light, but it absorbs and emits heat significantly at infrared wavelengths mostly because of the water in the atmosphere. n The adiabatic lapse rate just computed does not include the possibility of condensation of moisture; for that reason it is called the dry adiabatic lapse rate....
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Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers13 -...

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