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Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers17

Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers17 - n Two...

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1 n At that point the “cooling wave” from the ground runs  into the lapse rate left over from the previous day, and  the temperature continues along up the standard  atmosphere curve. n This pattern is called an inversion.
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2 n Inside the inversion the situation is extremely stable. n Above the inversion, in the region with the standard lapse  rate, the situation is mildly stable. n This kind of inversion is the most common one and is  called a radiation inversion.
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3 n When the sun comes up, it heats the ground surface,  which heats the layer of air above it.
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Unformatted text preview: n Two hours after dawn, there will be a layer of warmed air near the ground, in which the lapse rate is practically the adiabatic lapse rate. n By four hours after sunrise the warmed air layer may have grown and almost eliminated the inversion. 4 n By midafternoon, enough heat has been transferred from the warmed ground surface to the adjacent air that the inversion is gone. n The heated air, which now has an adiabatic lapse rate, extends to perhaps 6,000 ft, where it encounters the more stable air above....
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