Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers25

Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers25 - lapse...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 n It is a relatively large number in the tropics, where X is  large and condensation occurs at low elevations. n A typical value of the moist adiabatic lapse rate is about  6.5  /km. this is close to the lapse rate in the “standard  atmosphere”.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 n Returning to Fig. 5.6, if a parcel of air is at or near its  saturation point (RH=100%), then if it is moved up,  condensation will occur, and it will follow the moist  adiabatic lapse rate rather than the dry one. n If it contains droplets (a cloud or fog) and it is moved  down, some of the droplets it contains will evaporate and  its temperature will follow the moist adiabatic lapse rate  too.
Background image of page 2
3 n If the surrounding air is dry and has the dry adiabatic 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: lapse rate, then the surrounding air would be neutral for an intruding parcel of dry air but quite unstable for an intruding parcel of moist air. n This is the reason for the growth of clouds and thunderstorms. 4 n If an air parcel rises into a region where the water in it can condense but where the surrounding air has a lapse rate grater than the moist adiabatic lapse rate, then the parcel will rise and condense, and continue to do so until most of its moisture is condensed or until it reaches a place where the lapse rate is less than the moist adiabatic lapse rate. n It can grow explosively upward to form a large thunderstorm....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/14/2011 for the course CIVL CIVL345 taught by Professor Hsinchu during the Spring '11 term at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Page1 / 4

Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers25 - lapse...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online