Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers34

Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers34 -...

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1 n In the left side of Fig. 5.15, we see the lower atmospheric  temperature as a function of time. n At 6 a.m. there is a strong ground-based radiation  inversion, caused by nocturnal cooling of the ground. n As soon as the sun hits the ground, its temperature rises,  and an unstable layer is formed that eats away at the  bottom of the inversion.
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2 n Returning to the right side of Fig. 5.15, we see that when  the unstable layer reaches the plume, at perhaps 8:30  a.am., the plume will mix down to the ground. n In this instance the plume will not have been diluted  much from its initial concentration, so that the ground  level concentration at that point and that time will be 
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Unformatted text preview: surprisingly high. 3 n The high concentration will not last long, but such short, intense exposures can damage crops, etc. n This kind of event is called a fumigation. n Fumigations can also occur if the plume from a shoreline source is carried inland by a stable onshore breeze. 4 n In most of the eastern United States there is a more or less regular alternation of air masses from the Gulf of Mexico (warm, humid) and from central Canada (cold, dry). n In the autumn one of these air masses will sometimes remain in place for four or more days....
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Meteorology for Air Pollution Control Engineers34 -...

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