--EST handout

--EST handout - Empirically Supported Treatments for...

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Empirically Supported Treatments for Children and Adolescents What is Evidence Based Practice and Empirically Supported Treatments? Evidence based practice (EBP) is an approach to patient care that encourages clinicians to consider and synthesize empirical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient values in implementing treatments. Empirically-supported treatments (ESTs) are treatments whose demonstrated efficacy meets a standard of empirical investigation as determined by various methodological criteria. Why is Evidence Based Practice Important? There are a number of reasons for why it is important to use Evidence Based Practice. First APA has adopted a policy statement on EBP as a preferred approach to psychological treatment for young people. Second, it is our ethical responsibility to discuss EBPs with a family because provision of therapy that is not based on empirical evidence is associated with greater treatment failure. Finally, insurance companies increasingly demand evidence for the empirical basis for an assessment or treatment approach before reimbursing for services. There are many interventions that have shown efficacy for youth and their families. The list and descriptions provided below are just a sample of some empirically supported treatments for child and adolescent populations. How Are Empirically Supported Treatments Rated by Division 53? Division 53 has given each EST a rating based on the empirical support for that EST in the literature. There are three ratings: Well-Established, Probably Efficacious, and Possibly Efficacious. Well-Established- There must be at least two good group-design experiments that are conducted in at least two independent research settings and by independent investigatory teams. Efficacy must be demonstrated by showing the treatment to be: a) statistically significantly superior to pill or psychological placebo or to another treatment OR b) equivalent (or not significantly different) to an already established treatment in experiments with statistical power being sufficient to detect moderate differences AND a) treatment manuals or logical equivalent were used for the treatment b) conducted with a specified population, for whom inclusion criteria have been delineated in a reliable, valid manner c) reliable and valid outcome assessment measures, at minimum taping the problems targeted for change d) appropriate data analyses. Probably Efficacious- There must be at least two good experiments showing that the treatment is superior (statistically significantly) to a wait-list control group OR one or more good experiments meeting the Well-Established Criteria with the one exception of having been conducted in at least two independent research settings and by independent investigatory teams. Possibly Efficacious- There must be at least one good study showing the treatment to be
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This note was uploaded on 10/14/2011 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor X during the Spring '11 term at Fairfield.

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--EST handout - Empirically Supported Treatments for...

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