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Unformatted text preview: ITIL® Version 3 Road Show The ITIL Service Team OGC Contract Mgmt TSO Core Practices IP Mgmt Board Quals Board Web Services APMG Exam Institutes Examiner Panels Marketing Comp Portfolio Course Providers Partners The Purpose of V3 • • • • • Meet the needs of today and tomorrow Evolve SM practices to next level of maturity Address current practice gaps Embed solid processes into a service lifecycle Stronger connection to converging frameworks – Governance – Standards – Management The need for change • • • • • More practical ‘how to’ guidance Improved consistency and comprehensiveness Extend the focus to measurable business value Visible links to other industry practices Guidance in context to current needs ITIL – At your Service Core Structure ISO 20000 ISO 27001 CMMI COBIT eSCM Six Sigma Why a Lifecycle? • Building on a great practice base • Enabling integration with business process • Managing services from cradle to grave • Removing process silos • Reflecting the public feedback for holistic lifecycle focus A lifecycle stage at work Plan Do Check Policies & Principles Processes Measure Fundamentals Activities Review Organization R&R Functions Deliverables to next stage Act Non‐linear process Event Incident Problem Technology Access Generation Financial Catalogue Service Level Availability Capacity Continuity Supplier Portfolio Demand Change Asset & Configuration Release and Deployment Validate Value for Services • Services as Assets – Sustainable performance – Service Utility and Warranty What the customer gets – ‘fit for purpose’ How it is delivered – ‘fit for use’ The Service Portfolio Service Portfolio Service Catalogue(s) Services Description Value Proposition Business Cases Priorities Risks Offerings and Packages Cost and Pricing Supported Products Policies Ordering and Request Procedures Support Terms and Conditions Entry Points and Escalations Pricing and Chargeback Five Aspects of Service Design 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Requirements, Resources, Capabilities Management Systems, Tools Technology and Management architectures Processes Measurement systems Service Knowledge and Stability Se ice Knowledge and Stab lity Service Knowledge Management System Wisdom Presentation Layer Knowledge Information Data Knowledge Processing Layer Informatio n Integration Layer Data and Informatio n Service Knowledge base CMIS KEDB AMIS Integrated CMDB CMDB1 DML1 CMDB2 DML2 Enhancing the decision power in Service Management Continual Improvement Continual Improveme t 7 Steps to Service Improvement Identify • Vision, & Strategy • Tactical Goals • Operational Goals 7. 1. Define what you should measure 2. Define what you can measure 3. Implement corrective action Gather the data Goals Present and use the information assessment summary action plans, etc. 6. Who? How? When? Integrity of data? 5. Analyze the data Relations? Trends? According to plan? Targets met? Corrective action? 4. Process the data Frequency? Format? System? Accuracy? ITIL Complementary Portfolio Supports the ITIL Core Topic Specific Enhanced Guidance Industry Developed Research Supported Living Library Industry owned ITIL Branded •Official Study Aids •Outsourcing Expertise •Scalable Adaptation •Public Sector •Knowledge System •Measurement •ITIL for Executives •ITIL in various sectors •ITIL in various platforms Commences June 2007 Business Benefits of V3 Improved use of IT investments Imp oved use of IT investments Integration of business and IT value In gration of business and IT value Portfolio driven service assets P rtfolio driven service assets Clear demonstration of ROI and ROV ear demonstration of ROI and ROV Agile adaptation and flexible service models A ile adaptation and flexible service mode Performance and measures that are business P formance and measures that are busi ess value based val e based • IT Service Assets linked to business services IT Se ice Assets linked to business se ices • • • • • • From ITILv2 to ITILv3 “Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." - Pablo Picasso ITIL v2 Publication Framework ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle What do you see? There are no triangles. We provide the edges as we provide our views of the world. • The “edge” of IT was once to be found solely in technology. • ITIL rearranged the “edge” to include people and process. • ITILv3 once again rearranges the “edge.” This time with a focus on services. The future: A global service economy 2004 Labor % G % S China 21.0 50 15 35 191 India 17.0 60 17 23 28 U.S. 4.8 3 27 70 21 Indonesia 3.9 45 16 39 35 Brazil 3.0 23 24 53 20 Russia 2.5 12 23 65 38 Japan 2.4 5 25 70 40 Nigeria 2.2 70 10 20 30 Banglad. 2.2 63 11 26 30 Germany 1.4 3 33 64 44 Nation % WW % A 25 yr % delta S United States “Steps towards a Science of Service Systems”, Jim Sporhrer,et al. IBM Agriculture Goods Services The past: “What ever happened to other process frameworks such as TQM, BPR, QC, et al.?” History teaches us that process frameworks don’t solve everything. In fact, they often bring their own set of challenges. Critiques common to all process frameworks: •“…transformed our organization from functional silos to process silos.” Left ignored, these challenges work against the long-term success of the organization. • “…oversimplified an increasingly complex business environment.” • “…offered only a basic pragmatism.” • “…potpourri of loosely interconnected, and often redundant, vignettes in search of a framework.” • “…ignored swings in priorities such as cost reduction, revenue growth, competitive advantage, profit or market domination.” What is the service strategy of ITILv2? • A model whereby the strategy is the optimization of work tasks. • The parameters of value are contained within the walls of IT • Value means making whatever you want more efficiently. ITIL v2 Publication Framework • Not wrong, but are you making the right things to begin with, or can you create more value by undertaking broader or narrower missions? What is the service strategy of ITILv3? • It is a model whereby the strategy begins with the customer’s desired outcomes. • “Customers don’t buy products, they buy the satisfaction of particular needs.” • This means that what the customer values is often different from what the service provider thinks he or she provides. • Acknowledges that every service provider is subject to competitive forces. Service Strategy sits at the core of the new ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle What is a Service? Services are a ‘means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve, without the ownership of specific costs and risks’. What is a Service? Services are a ‘means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve, without the ownership of specific costs and risks’. What is a Service? Services are a ‘means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve, without the ownership of specific costs and risks’. Utility: ‘What the Customer gets’ Utility is measured on the basis of the number of key ‘outcomes supported’ and ‘constraints removed’ + Warranty: ‘How is it delivered’ Warranty is measured in terms of the levels of Availability, Capacity, Continuity and Security = Value Creation The basis of differentiation in the Market Space What is a Service Strategy? A means to become not optional. • The lifecycle begins with Service Strategy, the discernment of an IT organization’s strategic purpose; a topic that often gets short shrift in the pursuit of day-to-day practicalities. • It service strategy helps senior managers understand how their organization will differ from competing alternatives and thereby satisfy both customers and stakeholders. • Properly done, these core strategic concepts can and should lead to powerful and practical insights – where is the organization headed and what does it need to do to get there? Operational efficiency is necessary but not sufficient. IT services are now part of the fabric of the business and customers expect guaranteed levels of service: • A few years ago, customers could only use ATMs to withdraw cash. Service strategies are required to create long-term value for Customers and Stakeholders. IT services are now part of the fabric of the business and customers expect guaranteed levels of service: • A few years ago, customers could only use ATM’s to withdraw cash. • Today, the entire customer experience may take place through ATMs: • • • • • • withdraw cash; pay in cheques and cash; manage their accounts; transfer money; obtain quotes for loans; top-up their mobile phones. Who will shape the service strategies of tomorrow? IT services are now part of the fabric of the business and customers expect guaranteed levels of service: • A few years ago, customers could only use ATM’s to withdraw cash. • Today, the entire customer experience may take place through ATMs: • • • • • • withdraw cash; pay in cheques and cash; manage their accounts; transfer money; obtain quotes for loans; top-up their mobile phones. • Service strategies will shape the ATMs of tomorrow. Why should CIOs care about ITILv3? Whilst CIO’s will still care about achieving ‘operational excellence’ in order to deliver robust services to the Business and its Customers… Inability to react effectively to major Service Events or Crisis Unacceptable levels of Service availability Unclear and uncontrolled Service costs Inability to respond to changing Business needs £ δ Perception of poor quality and inconsistent ways of working Inability to demonstrate regulatory compliance (eg – SOX)? Ineffective Service improvement Programmes Unclear compliance against Software Licence Agreements Inconsistent reporting of Service performance Complex infrastructure and unclear end-to-end IT Services Why should CIOs care about ITILv3? …they will also need to understand how to shape service strategies that create value for Business and its Customers. The new Service Strategy volume deals with these ‘C-Level’ Business concepts. For example: • Defining Services; • Defining Strategy; • Value Networks, Value Creation and Value Capture; • Market Spaces and Solution Spaces; • Business and IT Service Management; • Service Portfolios; • Enterprise Architecture and Service Oriented Architecture; • Types of Service Providers; • The Business Case for building Service Assets and Service Management Capabilities; • Measuring Service Performance. Business outcomes and performance of customer assets are the basis for valuing services and service management Leverage Leverage “People don’t buy quarter-inch drills. They buy quarter-inch holes.” - Theodore Levitt Service management synchronizes the productive capacity of service assets with business activity of customer assets Customer Usage profiles Patterns of business activity Customer assets Service Provider Services Operation schedules Resource allocation Capacity adjustments Service assets Service Level Packages Pricing policies Service Level Agreements Principles in practice Specialization & coordination Synchronization Closed-loop system Feedback & learning Loose-coupling Services and service level packages are tagged with the outcomes for which they have service potential WSP1 COM1 STR1 SEC1 WSP2 COM2 STR2 SEC2 WSP3 COM3 STR3 SEC3 “Keeping geeks happy for over a quarter of a century.” Credo of James J. Skees Building Facilities Manager, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University On behalf of customers, Relationship Managers negotiate productive capacity in the form of suitable services Product Manager Productive capacity Principles in practice Separation of concerns Service Catalogue Agency Loose-coupling Portfolio The Service Portfolio represents investments across the Service Lifecycle necessary to implement strategy Third-party catalogue Service Design Service Operation Retired services Economy does not lie in sparing money, but in spending it wisely. - Thomas Henry Huxley So, Service Strategy is not the exclusive concern of “strategists” who come to work in specially marked cars!! CIO / Director Product Manager See first that the design is wise and just: that ascertained, pursue it resolutely do not for one repulse forego the purpose that you resolved to effect William Shakespeare 1564 -1616 A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof was to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. Douglas Adams Business Process Change Business Requirements & Feasibility Business Process Development IT Service Requirement Business Process Implementation IT Service IT Service Lifecycle Business Benefits Realisation Service Definition Definition: 'The design of appropriate and innovative IT services, including their architectures, processes, policies and documentation, to meet current and future agreed business requirements' The Business / Customers Requirements Service Strategy Policies Service Portfolio Service Catalogue Strategies Objectives from Requirements Resource and constraints Service Design SDPs Standards Architectures Solution Designs Service Transition SKMS Transition Plans Service Operation Tested solutions Operational Plans Continual Service Improvement Operational services Improvement actions & plans The five aspects of Service Design • Design of the service solutions • Design of the Service Management Tools (and other supporting systems) • Design of the technology architectures and management systems • Design of the processes • Design of the measurement systems, methods and metrics Service Design • There is a requirement to design all processes • Processes covered in detail: – – – – – – – Service Level Management Availability Management IT Service Continuity Management Supplier Management Information Security Management Capacity Management Service Catalogue Management ………. The Service Catalogue Business Process 1 Business Process 2 Business Process 3 Business Service Catalogue Service A Service B Service D Service C Service E Technical Service Catalogue Support Services Hardware Software Applications Data Customer perspective Innovative perspective Financial perspective Business objectives & metrics Customer perspective Overall service & customer metrics Business perspective Business perspective Innovative perspective Financial perspective IT objectives & metrics (Response & (Financial (Process (Customer Satisfaction) performance) innovation) performance) Service Customer Customer Service quality feedback complaints functionality Individual Process metrics Process 3 Process 2 Process 1 progress compliance effectiveness efficiency Service D S rvice Customer Customer Service Service C iy Service Customer Customer Service it Service B vice Customer Customer Service ty Service Customer Customer Service Service A quality surveys complaints functionality Individual service & customer metrics Individual Component metrics Component 3 Component 2 Component 1 Availability Performance Capacity Failures Changes “Design is the art of gradually applying constraints until only one solution remains.” Level of warranty Resource constraints including schedules Value & ethics Existing commitments Comparative unit costs Copyright, patents & trademarks Acceptable service solution Solution space or the set of designs that are allowed with the given set of constraints Capability constraints Utility to be provided Desired service solution Technology constraints Compliance with Standards & regulations Other constraints: policy, governance, etc.. Operational New Services New Requirements Service Strategy Strategies and constraints Analyse requirements, document & agree Design service solution Service Design Package Evaluate alternative solutions Procure the preferred solution Service Transition Service Operations Service Design Develop the solution Architectures Service Portfolio Measurement Methods Key Service Design processes Service Catalogue SLM: Policy, plans, SIP, SLRs, SLAs, OLAs, reports Service Catalogue M. Capacity: Policy, plans, CMIS, reports, sizing, forecasts Service Level Management Availability Policy, plans, design criteria, risk analysis, AMIS, reports, schedules Capacity Management IT SCM: Policy, Plans, BIA, BCPs, IT SCPs, risk analysis, reports & schedules Availability Management IT Service Continuity M. Security: Policy, plans, risk analysis, reports, classification, controls Information Security Supplier: Policy, plans, reports, SCD , contracts Supplier Management Processes input from other areas: including Event, Information, Incident, Problem, Request Fulfilment, Access, Change, Configuration, Knowledge,, Release Planning, Risk Evaluation, Testing, Build and Test, Release Acceptance, Deployment, IT Financial, Service Portfolio, Demand Management Summary • “Design is so critical it should be on the agenda of every meeting in every single department.” Tom Peters • “Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” Steve Jobs • “Good design is the most important way to differentiate ourselves from our competitors.” Samsung CEO Yun Jong Yong • “Your products run for election every day and good design is critical to winning the campaign.” Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley • “Design's fundamental role is problem solver” Fast Company Service Transition Taking ITIL forward • Value to the business – Integrate/align new or changed services with the customer’s business – Ensure that the changed service can be used in a way that maximizes value to the business operations – Deliver more change successfully • • • • Across the customer base Reduce unpredicted impact and risks Reduce variation - ‘estimated’ v. ‘actuals’ Services - fit for purpose, fit for use What is Service Transition? • Taking the design and transitioning the Service into operations – focused on Service • Delivering in the actual circumstances • Practices to: – – – – – Make it easier for to adopt and manage change Standardize transition activities Maintain the integrity of configurations as they evolve Expedite effective decisions Ensure new / changed services will be deployable, manageable, maintainable, cost-effective Key Processes • Lots that isn’t new - but improved – Change management – Configuration management – Release and Deployment • Nothing much there to upset your – Tools – Training – Practitioners Change Management Scope Business Service provider Supplier Strategic change Manage the business Manage IT services Manage the supplier’s business Tactical change Manage the business processes Service portfolio Manage external services Service operations External operations Service change Operational change Manage business operation What’s improved Change & configuration management • Change – Normal, standard emergency change models – Change evaluation – More granular change authorization • Design – Configuration structures, models, levels – Processes, procedures, workflows – Configuration management system • Managing change to service assets and configurations – Optimisation and lifecycle management of service assets – Capturing baselines and releases – Minimizing issues due to improper configurations Configuration Management System - CMS Presentation Layer Knowledge Processing Layer Information Integration Layer Data and Information Integrated CMDB CMDB1 DML1 CMDB2 DML2 What’s improved Release and Deployment Change Management Service Asset and Configuration Management Plan and prepare release Build and test Release and Deployment Service testing and pilots Plan & prepare deployment Transfer, Deploy, Retire Early Life Support Review and close service transition What’s new Transition planning and support • Integrated planning – Transition capacity and resources – Across all service transition • With service operations and CSI • With the business, customer and users • Proactive support – – – – Maintain/ re-use transition models Progress tracking & management Course corrections Transition closure What Else is New Change Management Service Asset and Configuration Management Oversee management of organization and stakeholder change Service Transition Planning and Support Plan and prepare release Build and test Release and Deployment Service testing and pilots Plan & prepare deployment Transfer, Deploy, Retire Early Life Support Service Validation, Testing and Evaluation Knowledge Management Review and close service transition What’s new – Service V model Level 1 Level 2 Business/ Customer Needs Service Operations Service Acceptance Service Design Service Op. Readiness Test Level 3 Service Transition Stage 1 Level 4 Level 5 Build & Test Structure, baselines, evidence More controlled handovers / release Test models and Testing perspectives What’s new – SKMS Service Knowledge Management System Decisions Configuration Management System Configuration Management Databases What’s new - Managing organizational change • Strategies to manage organization, stakeholder, people change • People’s commitment, roles and emotions optimum performance Performance shock external blame avoidance self blame The emotional cycle of change Time Service Transition – Moving ITIL forward • • • • Delivering what the business needs Services fit for purpose, fit for use Integrated, holistic, standard approach Reduce variation predicted vs actual • Quality, Cost, Time • Capabilities, Resources, Capacity • Risks, Errors and incidents • More IT enabled change that adds value to the customer’s business Shirley Lacy Ivor Macfarlane Why Service Operation? • Stability but not stagnation • Realizing value • Responding to operational needs in Business and Technology • Great design is worth little if it can not be delivered • Achieving balance What Were we Thinking? • Service and Infrastructure are not different worlds • Different service models will be operated differently – we limited ourselves to IT • The “what” and the “who” are equally important • The world of Operation does not stand alone Context - Monitor Control Loop Norm Control Compare Monitor Input Activity Output Complex Monitor Control Loops Norm Control Compare Monitor Norm Norm Control Control Compare Activity Outp Compare Control Monitor Monitor Input Norm Input Activity Outp Compare Monitor Input Activity Output Business Executives, Business Unit Managers, Customers Service Strategy 1 Portfolio, Standards, Architectures Service Design 2 Service Transition Tech Architectures, Performance Stds Norm Norm Control Control Compare Activity Out Norm Compare Control Monitor Monitor Input 3 Input Activity Out Continual Service Improvement Compare Monitor Input Activity Output Technical Experts, Vendor Support, IT Operational Staff Users IT Managers, Vendor Account Execs, IT Execs Context - The ITSM Lifecycle Processes ITIL V3 Global Roadshow Service Operation Processes Incident Management Service Operation Processes Event Management Incident Management Incident Management Request Fulfillment Service Operation Processes Event Management Incident Management Self Help Incident Management Request Fulfillment Self Help • Significant potential to: – Improved responsiveness – Reduced demands on IT staff – Reduced costs – Improved standardization – Improved quality Self Help Web Based Front End Menu Driven Shopping Cart Experience Incident Management Request Fulfillment Change Management Deployment Access Management Asset or CMDB Event Management Logging and Filtering Exception Filter Warning Event Information Event Management Managing Exceptions Incident Incident Management Problem Problem Management Incident/ Exception Problem / Change? RFC Change Management Event Management Information & Warnings Incident Incident/ Problem / Change? Problem RFC Alert Warning Auto Response Log Information Human Intervention Service Operation Processes Problem Control Error Control Problem Control Service Operation Reactive Processes Problem Control Error Control Problem Management Problem Control Service Operation Reactive Processes Problem Control Error Control Problem Management Known Error Problem Control Service Operation Reactive Processes Problem Control Error Control Problem Management Known Error Problem Control Service Operation Reactive Processes Problem Control Error Control Problem Control Problem Management Known Error Service Operation Functions Service Desk IT Operations Management Technical Management Application Management Operations Control Facilities Management Common SO Activities • • • • • • • • • Mainframe Management Server Management Network Management Storage and Archive Database Administration Directory Services Management Desktop Management Internet / Web Management Etc. The Application Management Lifecycle Requirements Optimize Design Operate Build Deploy The Application Management Lifecycle Requirements Optimize Design Operate Build Deploy Questions? Questions? N Thank Audience Leave Y Answer Known? N State that time has run out Y Answer Organizations Have Always Talked About It • CSI is not a new concept. Organizations have talked about it for many years; but, for most, the concept has not moved beyond the discussion stage. • For many organizations, CSI becomes a project when something has failed and severely impacted the business. • When the issue is resolved, the concept is promptly forgotten until the next major failure occurs What’s Different in v3 • Most everything • CSI was only addressed as part of Service Level Management in v2 • Addressed as part of the overall Service Lifecycle • Improvement Model in v3 • Continual Improvement Process in v3 CSI Goals, Scope & Key Processes • Goals – To identify and implement improvement activities on IT Services that support the business processes as well as identify and implement improvements to IT Service Management processes. The improvement activities will support the Lifecycle approach through Service Strategies, Service Design, Service Transition, and Service Operations and should always be looking for ways to improve process effectiveness, efficiency as well as cost effectiveness • Scope – Service and Service Management improvement – All of IT • Key Processes – Service Level Management (monitor, report, review) – Problem Management (Proactive / trending / analysis) – Knowledge Management (DIKW) CSI Objectives • • • • • • Review, analyze and make recommendations on improvement opportunities in each lifecycle phase: Service Strategies, Service Design, Service Transition, and Service Operations Review and analyze Service Level Achievement results Identify and implement improvement activities to improve IT Service quality and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of ITSM processes Improve cost effectiveness of delivering IT Services Identify and implement improvement activities of the ITSM processes and supporting tools Ensure applicable quality management methods are used to support continual improvement activities Continual Service Improvement Model What is the Vision? Where are we now? How do we keep the momentum going? Business Vision, mission, goals and objectives Baseline Assessments Where do we want to be? Measurable Targets How do we get there? Service & Process Improvement Did we get there? Measurements & Metrics The Continual Improvement Process Identify • Vision, & Strategy • Tactical Goals • Operational Goals 7. 1. Define what you should measure Implement corrective action 2. Define what you can measure 3. Gather the data Goals 6. Present and use the information assessment summary action plans, etc. Who? How? When? Integrity of data? 5. Analyze the data Relations? Trends? According to plan? Targets met? Corrective action? 4. Process the data Frequency? Format? System? Accuracy? Service Lifecycle Improvement Service Strategy Strategies Policies & Standards Feedback lessons learned for improvement Feedback lessons learned for improvement Service Design Output Plans to create and modify services and service management processes Feedback lessons learned for improvement Feedback lessons learned for improvement Service Transition Output Manage the transition into production of a new or changed service and/or service management process Feedback lessons learned for improvement Service Operation Output Continual Service Improvement Activities are Embedded in the Service Lifecycle Day to day operations of services and service management processes CSI Review • Key Messages – Everyone has responsibility for continual improvement – Each handoff can provide an opportunity for improvement – Relies on other service management processes • Needs to be treated just like any other process – Policies – Roles and responsibilities (different for program, project and production) – Procedures – Management information and reporting OGC Contract Mgmt Accreditor Publisher TSO Products Core Practices IP Mgmt Board Quals Board Web Services APMG Partners Exam Institutes Examiner Panels Marketing Comp Portfolio Course Providers Partners Examiners, Working Groups Development of Qualification structure for ITIL v3 Design the certification elements required of the scheme Produce the requirements for learning objectives and knowledge competency Produce the supporting accredited formal syllabi Produce the requirements for delivery mechanism Produce sample examinations in support of the syllabi Provide recommendation on the required trainer and course provider competency to deliver against the scheme Manage Exam bank Must offer value to the career objectives of the student Allow innovation and flexibility and value for Course Providers Meets learning objectives and competency outcomes Blooms taxonomy for setting exams Contribute to the maturity of ITSM professionalism Responsive to evolving market demand Transitional V2 – V3 bridging Modular design Official Study aids Flexible Choice Career path oriented V2 to V3 bridging Service Lifecycle Service Capability Classroom E-learning On Demand examination Live Exam Bank Advanced SM Professional Diploma E LI FE CY CL D SE BA ITIL Foundation for Service Management E OL ITIL Service Capability Modules /R ITIL Service Lifecycle Modules SS Managing through the Lifecycle E OC PR BA SE D ITIL Diploma Advanced SM Professional Pro ess ona Diploma ITIL Diploma Achieved 3 3 3 re St am re am St Li f ec yc le 3 lity 3 16 Credits bi pa 15Credits 5 Ca Managing through the Lifecycle 5 2 credits ITIL Foundation for Service Management Advanced SM Professional Profess ona Diploma ITIL Diploma Achieved V3 Manager Bridge 5 5 Managing through the Lifecycle 5 15Credit 3 V2 Service Manager 17 3 3 16 Credits 3 3 2 credits ITIL Foundation for Service Management V3 Bridge .5 V2 Foundation Certificate 1.5 V3 Bridge .5 Unit Content ITILFND01 Service Management as a practice The purpose of this unit is to help the candidate to define Service and to comprehend and explain the concept of Service Management as a practice. Specifically, candidates must be able to: 1.Describe the concept of Good Practice (SS, SD, ST, SO, CSI 1.2.2) 2.Define and explain the concept of a Service (SS, SD, ST, SO, CSI 2.2.1) 3.Define and explain the concept of Service Management (SS, SD, ST, SO, CSI 2.1) 4.Define and distinguish between Functions, Roles and Processes (SS 2.3, 2.6.1, 2.6.2, SD 2.3, SD 3.6.4, ST 2.3 SO 2.3, 3.1, CSI 2.3) 5.Explain the process model (SD 3.6.4) 6.List the characteristics of processes (Measurable, Specific results, Customers, and Responds to a specific event) (SS 2.6.2 SD, ST, SO, CSI 2.3.2) The recommended study period for this unit is 1 hour. Foundation Approved - Launch June 13th V2 – V3 Foundation bridge in review Lifecycle and Capability Modules in development Professional Module in development QUALIFICATION DATE V3 Foundation Examination June 2007 (V2 Foundation ends Dec 31 2007) V2 to V3 Foundation Bridge Q3 2007 V2 to V3 Managers Bridge Examination Q3 2007 Diploma available to existing Managers Q3 2007 Lifecycle Modules Q3 2007 Capability Modules Q3 2007 Managing Through The Lifecycle Examination Q4 2007 Diploma available to new students Q4 2007 V2 Managers/Practitioners retired Q4 2008 • Service Management is the means but not an end – • • A route guide and trip planner V3 Core practices are the seeds of future vision A community garden tended by fellow travelers Applied the service lifecycle to V3 Strategy Defined our market Created the portfolio scope Built the organizational structure Design Gathered requirements Designed the infrastructure Delivered a SDP to the author team Transition Built the practice Tested and validated with QA Established the SAC Deployed the service Operation Now in Early Life support Begin monitoring and control Need your feedback to measure and monitor the health of ITIL itSMF members are a nucleus of knowledge and experiences You are our partners in research and innovation ITIL for our future The Core radiates knowledge, The Complement builds upon it, The ITSM community breathes life into it. When we invest in the future… We create it! ITIL V3 Global Roadshow ...
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