Detecting_and_Avoiding_Plagiarism

Detecting_and_Avoiding_Plagiarism - Plagiarism Academic...

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Detecting and Avoiding  Plagiarism
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Academic Integrity Policy The Academic Integrity Policy of Ashford University States: “Students of Ashford University will follow expected levels of academic integrity. Ashford University defines academic misconduct as dishonest and/or deceptive attempts to fulfill academic requirements. Cheating, furnishing fabricated or false information to Ashford University officials and adjuncts (such as lying to affect a grade change), and plagiarism constitute acts of academic misconduct, and will be met with censure.” We have designed this tutorial to assist you in detecting and avoiding plagiarism.
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What is Plagiarism? According to the Academic Integrity Policy of Ashford University: “Plagiarism occurs when a student deliberately uses the ideas, language, or another writer’s original material (that is not common knowledge ) without acknowledging the source. Plagiarized materials include texts (print or on- line), as well as the work of other students. Plagiarizing denies the student the powerful opportunity to develop as an ethical and conscientious human being. Herein rests the greatest reason not to plagiarize.” Plagiarism most often occurs when a student fails to properly cite his or her source of information. We will now explore various errors in citation. For a review of APA citations, please click here . To begin the tutorial, please click here .
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What is Common Knowledge ? Some students have the mistaken notion that they must give credit to a source only when they use a direct quotation. Paraphrasing (putting ideas into your own words) or changing a word or two in a source does not relieve the student of responsibility to credit the source. If an idea is not your own, you must cite the source in the text of the paper and at the end of the paper as a reference. The only exception to this rule is if the idea the student uses is common knowledge . Facts that are common knowledge will generally be known by many people and can easily be found or referenced. Common knowledge facts (for example, that the Robert Kennedy was assassinated in 1968) do not need to be documented. However, students must reference lesser known ideas and interpretations of the common knowledge (for example, a press release defense attorney Lawrence Teeter made regarding the possible innocence of Sirhan Sirhan, the accused assassin). Next
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Common Knowledge? Read the two statements below. Click on the choice that is common knowledge: 1. Albert Camus was born in Mondovi, Algeria in 1913 and died in 1960 in an auto 2. I was saddened when the great guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan died. I’ll always r Next
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Detecting Plagiarism We will now explore different examples of a mock student’s writing. You will first see the original text from the article, followed by the student’s use of the material. You will then determine if the student is committing plagiarism or not.
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