Verifying and Filling a Prescription

Verifying and Filling a Prescription - treatment period....

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Verifying and Filling a Prescription The first step in verifying a prescription is to receive the order whether the patient hand delivers, faxed from the doctor, or called in by the doctor. The order must be checked for legality. The technician must check the full name on the prescription as well as the date written. The pharmacy must have the address and phone number of the patient on file. After this information is verified, the dosage form, strength, quantity, and medication name will need to be verified. The directions must be checked for refills, or if generics can be used. The prescription will need the prescriber’s signature. If the drug is controlled it must contain a DEA number. When filling the prescription the medication needs to be checked for inventory. The medication is then checked to make sure the name matches the prescription order by checking the lot and UPC numbers. Then the expiration date must be checked to make sure it will not expire during
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Unformatted text preview: treatment period. Any drugs that require logging must be logged for inventory. The drug should be counted twice before given to pharmacist for final count. The label is then checked to make sure directions for use, dosage, amount, and name of drug are included along with the name and phone number of the pharmacy. The prescription is given to pharmacist for final check. Any step missed can result in errors. Adequate checks will ensure a completed process and accuracy. I would recommend that each step be done twice. If a tech fails to verify the prescription a patient could receive the wrong medication which could result in death or serious injury. Technologies used to maintain accuracy in the pharmacy is having a scanning system in place to scan the drug as this will prevent errors in the filling process....
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course HCP210 HCP210 taught by Professor Barbara during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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