Chapt. 19 Outline

Chapt. 19 Outline - I. Prophets and goals of the New South...

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Unformatted text preview: I. Prophets and goals of the New South 1. Henry Grady of the Atlanta Constitution: 1. The new south presents a perfect democracy of small farms and diversifying industries 2. Other prominent leaders insisted that the South must liberate itself from nostalgia and create a modern society of small farms, thriving industries, and bustling cities. 2. The New South "gospel" 1. Industrial development chief accomplishment was expansion of regions textile industry; tobacco (Duke family); systematic use of other nat. resources (made Birmingham, Alabama to be called Pittsburgh of the South due to its iron core); industrial growth leads to an increase in need for housing and thus led to an increase in lumbering. 2. Agricultural variety other than cotton the Confederacy reasoned that the had lost the war bc it had relied too much on cotton. In the future the South must follow the Norths example and industrialize 2.1. King Cotton survived the Civil War and expanded over new acreage even as its export markets leveled off. 3. Economic diversity leads to real democracy II. Economic growth in the New South 1. Textile mills 2. Tobacco 1. The Dukes and the American Tobacco Company 3. Coal and iron ore 4. Lumber arose due to an increase in need for housing as a result of the increase in industrialization of the economy. 5. Miscellaneous industries III. Agriculture in the New South 1. Problems in southern agriculture 1. Land ownership rare 1.1.1. Sharecropping sharcroppers had nothing to offer landowners except their labor in exchange for a share of the crop (generally about half), and supplies 1.1.2. Tenant farming hardly better off than sharecroppers, might have their own mule, plow, and line of credit w/country store. They were entitled to claim a larger share of the crops. (tenant lacked incentive to care for the land and owner was largely unable to supervise the work) 1.1. Small landholders use the crop-lien system one way people devised to operate w/out cash country merchants furnished supplies to small farmers in return for liens (or mortgages) on their crops 1.1.1.1. This encouraged the growth of cotton during the time period 1.2. Credit and markets tied to cash crop of cotton IV. Tenancy and the environment 1. Staple crops and mobile farmers lead to lack of sustainability 1. Nutrients leached from soils 2. Fertilizers exacerbate the problem burn everything up 3. Eventual erosion leads to "ravaged" lands V. The political leaders of the New South 1. Definition and evaluation of the term "Bourbon" 1. The Redeemers included a rising class of lawyers, merchants, and entrepreneurs who were...
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Chapt. 19 Outline - I. Prophets and goals of the New South...

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