His113 WA4.2 - In 1832, Lowell, Massachusetts was little...

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In 1832, Lowell, Massachusetts was little more than a factory village, until the development of the water powered plant like the one in Waltham, Massachusetts. Soon Lowell started to grow and help was in great demand. News of the new water powered factories and the high wages they were offering to all working classes of people traveled to all parts of New England. The stories of the Lowell mills gave new life to lonely and dependent women in distant New England towns and farming communities. Since men were migrating westward, it left many of the women in New England ready to be put to work. Factory employers preferred to hire women, because they believed women had great manual dexterity and were willing to work for wages lower than what was being paid to men for the same work. Some women came to the Lowell mills to escape farm life while others just wanted to earn money to send home to their families (Tindall & Shi, 2007, p. 315). At the time the Lowell cotton mills were started, the occupation of a factory girl was
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course HISTORY 113 taught by Professor ?? during the Spring '10 term at Thomas Edison State.

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His113 WA4.2 - In 1832, Lowell, Massachusetts was little...

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