man372wa5 - Assessing and Understanding the Foreign...

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Assessing and Understanding the Foreign Exchange Market 1 Assessing and Understanding the Foreign Exchange Market Thomas Baker October 9, 2010 MAN-372 Professor Cheryl Toops
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Assessing and Understanding the Foreign Exchange Market 2 The foreign exchange market or forex market as it is often called is the market in which currencies are traded. Currency Trading is the world's largest market consisting of almost trillion in daily volume and as investors learn more and become more interested, the market continues to rapidly grow. Not only is the forex market the largest market in the world, but it is also the most liquid, differentiating it from the other markets. In addition, there is no central marketplace for the exchange of currency, but instead the trading is conducted over-the-counter. Unlike the stock market, this decentralization of the market allows traders to choose from a number of different dealers to make trades with and allows for comparison of prices. Typically, the larger a dealer is the better access they have to pricing at the largest banks in the world, and are able to pass that on to their clients. The spot currency market is open twenty-four hours a day, five days a week, with currencies being traded around the world in all of the major financial centers. All trades that take place in the foreign exchange market involve the buying of one currency and the selling of another currency simultaneously. This is because the value of one currency is determined by its comparison to another currency. The first currency of a currency pair is called the "base currency," while the second currency is called the counter currency. The currency pair shows how much of the counter currency is needed to purchase one unit of the base currency. Currency pairs can be thought of as a single unit that can be bought or sold. When purchasing a currency pair, the base currency is being bought, while the counter currency is being sold. The opposite is true, when the sale of a currency pair takes place. There are four major currency pairs that are traded most often in the foreign exchange market.
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man372wa5 - Assessing and Understanding the Foreign...

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