Chapter 4 - Job Analysis in HR Selection Chapter 4 Learning...

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Job Analysis in HR Selection Chapter 4
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Learning Objectives To explore the role of job analysis To describe various techniques used in collecting job information To examine how job information can be used to identify employee specifications (such as KSAs) necessary for successful job performance To examine how these specifications can be translated into the content of selection measures
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Job Analysis: A Definition Job Analysis Defined A purposeful, systematic process for collecting information on the important work-related aspects of a job Work activities—what a worker does; how, why, and when these activities are conducted Tools and equipment used in performing work activities Context of the work environment, such as work schedule or physical working conditions Requirements of personnel performing the job, such as knowledge, skills, abilities (KSAs), or other personal characteristics (like physical characteristics, interests, or personality)
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Job Analysis: Role in HR Selection Uses of Job Analysis Data Identify employee specifications (KSAs) necessary for success on a job. Select or develop predictors that assess important KSAs and can be administered to job applicants and used to forecast those employees who are likely to be successful on the job. Develop criteria or standards of performance that employees must meet in order to be considered successful on a job.
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Legal Issues in Job Analysis Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act It is illegal for an organization to refuse to select an individual or to discriminate against a person with respect to compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment because of the person’s race, sex, color, religion, or national origin Because many Title VII cases have concerned the role of discrimination in selection for employment, job analysis has emerged as critical to the prosecution or defense of a discrimination case
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Court Cases Involving Job Analysis Griggs v. Duke Power Co. Validation of a selection device involves an analysis of the job for which the device is used. Selection standards must reflect a meaningful study of their relationship to job-performance ability Albemarle Paper Co. v. Moody Supreme Court supported EEOC Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures requiring job analysis as part of a validation
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The Americans With Disabilities Act requires the identification of essential functions of a job Job Analysis is one legally defensible way to identify: the KSAs required the tasks that are essential the outcomes desired, AND what might be appropriate (“reasonable”) accommodation
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Legal Standards for Job Analysis Job analysis must be performed and must be for the job for which the selection instrument is to be utilized. Analysis of the job should be in writing.
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Chapter 4 - Job Analysis in HR Selection Chapter 4 Learning...

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