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lesson3a - Week 2 PSY 600 Learning to See Professor Eva...

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Week 2 PSY 600 Learning to See Professor Eva Douglas THE VISUAL SYSTEM Fovea - colour, sharpness (cells used are the cones) The Eye and the Brain?  Learning to see things ‘differently’…. . The physical and the psychological
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The ‘Magic’ of Perception: How we see depends ultimately on the cells in our eyes and our brains.   White sunlight incorporates all the spectral colours. The longest wavelength we can see is RED (approx. 670 nm) The shortest wavelength we can see is BLUE (approx. 380nm) RODS are retinal receptors responsible for seeing ‘light and dark’. CONES are retinal receptors for seeing different colours.
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Week 3 PSY 600 Learning to See Professor Eva Douglas There are no rod cells in the centre of the fovea. That is why a dim star often seems to disappear when you look straight at it, but reappear when when you look slightly away. Peripheral and foveal vision
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Eagles have exceptionally good vision (they can see a mouse running from a mile away. The eagle’s foveal pit is very deep. Their photoreceptors are even thinner, so they can be packed very tightly. This density of receptors makes for more detailed vision.
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Visual signals are first processed by the occipital lobe, and then higher processing occurs in the parietal lobe and the temporal lobe. Different parts of the brain process different kinds of information.
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Lingelbach Illusion This illusion depends on our small foveal vision, or the limited size of our central receptor field. In this illusion, there is also a timing difference between our central foveal response and our peripheral vision response. Our foveal response is slightly faster but more transient (it doesn’t last as long). Every time our eyes shift position, the cells signaling white at the intersections first give a strong center signal, but then the signal is reduced and this reduction is perceived as a darkening of the spot, as the surround or peripheral vision kicks in. An illusion showing the relationship between foveal and peripheral vision.
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Peripheral Vision Range Test: Do the PENCIL Exercise Many of our observations and aesthetic  judgements are dependent upon the  relationship of our peripheral vision range and  our foveal central vision field. FOVEAL  vision is for seeing ‘details’. FOVEAL vision is optimized for fine detail recognition. PERIPHERAL  vision is for organizing the spatial scene, for  seeing large objects. Peripheral vision is optimized for  coarser information. 
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What is the Magic of her Smile? The Mona Lisa,
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lesson3a - Week 2 PSY 600 Learning to See Professor Eva...

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