lesson4 - Stimulus Discrimination: If something looks...

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Stimulus Discrimination: If something looks familiar, you will recognize it immediately. Stimulus Generalization: The more alike two stimuli are, the more likely you will respond as if they were the same stimuli. Expansion of consciousness….
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Art stretches our perception because: As we learn to recognize varied approximations of familiar stimuli, we learn more about what makes up the image, sound, idea, that we are sensing. We learn to ‘extrapolate’ from less information…to use our imagination to ‘fill in the blanks’.
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The stimuli presented in art are usually distorted, but are still recognized by us as the same stimulus in all but the most abstract art forms .
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Without stimulus generalization , we would be incapable of learning: When the stimulus presented is identified with a known pleasurable or rewarding stimulus , we perceive “ beauty ”. ART thus helps us learn to see beauty in a greater diversity of stimuli .
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Henri Matisse, (1869 –1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draftsmanship. As a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but principally as a painter, Matisse is one of the best-known artists of the twentieth century. We recognize abstracted forms of ‘real’ objects, allowing us to imagine or bring these objects to life in our own personal way. This abstraction creates another layer of richness to our appreciation of the scene.
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In his book 'Phantoms in the Brain' the neurologist and brain specialist V S Ramachandran talks about certain mechanisms in the brain which allow it to fill in missing information, make generalizations and, where large gaps in sensory input exist, to actually impose objects on the perceptions. The objects dredged up from the memory by the brain and projected onto our perceptions then appear to fit seamlessly into the real world. Cat 1 Cat 2 Cat 3
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Week 3 PSY 600 Learning to See Professor Eva Douglas Biggest reason for why most people have difficulty drawing something…. “CONCEPTION OVER PERCEPTION” ( Your thinking overtakes your seeing) Seeing cat! Cat characteristics Feeling a cat! Thinking a cat!
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Self Portraits chronicle A Descent into Alzheimer’s Self portrait from 1967 William Utermohlen “Creativity ” remained intact as other parts of the brain deteriorated
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“From the first moment the artist realized he had Alzheimer’s in 1995, he began his series of now, famous self portraits in order to understand himself and his disease.” Dr. Bruce Miller
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The paintings starkly reveal the artist’s descent into dementia, as his world began to tilt, perspective flatten and
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lesson4 - Stimulus Discrimination: If something looks...

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