Chapter_20 IM 6e

Chapter_20 IM 6e - CHAPTER 20 THE RETELLING OF GREEK MYTHS:...

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CHAPTER 20 THE RETELLING OF GREEK MYTHS: OVID’S METAMORPHOSES MAIN POINTS 1. Something in Ovid’s writings offended Augustus, who banished him from Rome; perhaps he found that Ovid’s cynical depictions of gods and humans undermined the official image of sober Roman citizens. 2. Ovid’s theme in Metamorphoses is “bodies changed.” 3. Narrative links allow one tale to grow into another, reflecting the theme of transformation in the structure of the poem itself. 4. Beginning with creation, Ovid’s universe moves from chaos to order, where chaos is viewed as an intolerable condition; god, or nature, subdivides all creation and makes out boundaries, similar to the subdivisions of Rome. 5. Ovid is poking fun at Augustus, equating him with Jupiter, satirizing his attempt at imposing moral restraint on the elite patrician class. 6. Throughout much of the work, Ovid uses parody, mocking the gods and perhaps Augustus himself. 7. In the story of Echo and Narcissus, the comic overtones of this odd couple soon give way to a bleaker perspective. For both Echo and Narcissus, Eros, denied an external object, turns inward, with devastating results. Unable to express
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Chapter_20 IM 6e - CHAPTER 20 THE RETELLING OF GREEK MYTHS:...

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