Bergman Spartas Intervention Paper

Bergman Spartas Intervention Paper - Contingent Edibles 1...

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Contingent Edibles 1 Running Head: CONTINGENT EDIBLES The Effects of Contingent Edibles on Compliant Behavior With a Student Diagnosed with Severe Disabilities Amanda Bergman, Elizabeth Spartas, and Betty Fry Williams Whitworth University Abstract The purpose of this intervention was to determine the effects of contingent edibles for compliant behavior on the rate of non-compliant behavior with a high school - aged boy with severe disabilities . During each session, the student was required to transition from class to class exhibiting compliant behavior. No contingent rewards were provided for instances of non-compliant behavior, but edibles were given when the student was compliant. The intervention was effective in reducing the number of instances of non- compliant behavior from an average of 2.57 per baseline to an average of 0.28 per intervention. The procedure was inexpensive and was practical in implementation and
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Contingent Edibles 2 function. The student was motivated by the snacks and always smiled and clapped his hands when he received the reward for complaint behavior . The Effects of Contingent Edibles on Compliant Behavior With a Student Diagnosed with Severe Disabilities The term “severe disabilities” does not have a widely accepted definition. Most educators define a child with severe disabilities as one who needs instruction in basic skills, such as getting from place to place independently, communicating with others, controlling bowel and bladder functions, and self-feeding (Heward, 2000). IDEA considers children with severe emotional disturbances, autism, severe and profound mental retardation, and those who have two or more serious disabilities such as deaf- blindness, mental retardation and blindness, and cerebral palsy and deafness as severely disabled. Children with severe disabilities may experience severe speech, language and cognitive deficiencies, abnormal behavior such as failure to respond to surrounding stimuli, self-mutilation, self-medicating, and prolonged temper tantrums (Heward, 2000). The defining characteristic of students with severe disabilities is that they exhibit obvious deficits in multiple life-skill or developmental areas (Sailor & Guess, 1983). Estimates of
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Contingent Edibles 3 the prevalence of severe disabilities range from 0.1% to 1% according to Ludlow & Sobsey (1984). Because there is no widely accepted definition for students with severe disabilities, there are no accurate statistics on prevalence. Children with sever disabilities often exhibit behavior problems such as noncompliance. When a student exhibits noncompliant behavior this has a negative effect on both the learning of the student and that of other students in the classroom. By exhibiting noncompliant behavior students are not completing the tasks that they need to be finishing. The teacher, in accordance with designated guidelines, designs tasks; these tasks are presented in order for the student to learn and to accomplish set goals. By
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Bergman Spartas Intervention Paper - Contingent Edibles 1...

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