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kin final notes

kin final notes - Lecture 9 Motivating Children to Practice...

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Lecture 9: Motivating Children to Practice 3 Key Aspects of Practice: 1. Success Oriented a. 80% success rate b. Success = motivation to practice c. Age & experience d. Create & change tasks e. Encourage adjustment f. Fun 2. Intrinsically Motivating a. Satisfaction b. Avoid comparisons c. No contests d. Compare to self 3. Developmentally Appropriate a. Primary – Teacher b. Adolescence –peers c. Skill level matters 6 Techniques for Motivating Children 1. Teaching by Invitation a. Decision, Neutrality, Safety 2. Intratask Variation a. Teacher decides & modifies b. Match task to skill level (create different assignment addressing same concept) c. Private 3. Task Sheets a. Own pace b. Simple to Complex c. Individual d. Downfall… 4. Stations a. Review b. Fitness c. Keeps interest up d. Equipment 5. Child-designed Activities a. Problem-solving b. Creativity 6. Videotaping a. Visual feedback, Critique & improve Teaching Styles Definition & Framework Teaching Styles: Various ways teachers can organize and deliver the content to children Mosston’s Spectrum of Teaching Styles (Mosston, 1966): Universal theory that governs all teaching Fundamental Axiom: “Teaching is a chain of decision making.” The Clusters o The spectrum reflect 2 broad human abilities: a.i. To reproduce past knowledge (TEACHER CONTROL) a.ii. To produce new knowledge (STUDENT CONTROL)
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Style A: Command: o Def.: reproducing a predicted response or performance on cue o Roles: Teacher – makes all decisions Students – follow these decisions on cue o Reasons: Uniformity, Synchronicity, Conformity o Examples: Group calisthenics, Aerobics Dance – square, folk, line, ballroom Martial Arts Style B: Practice: o Def.: individual practice of memory task with private feedback o Roles: Teacher – makes all decisions, but now circulates to students & offers feedback Students – private practice of a memory task o Reasons: More responsibility to learner: helps them realize: task repetition = proficiency o Ex: Stations (alone, partners, groups) Practice a variety of assigned tasks Student reads task sheet/wall charts Style C: Reciprocal o Def.: repeated practice of tasks under the supervision of personal observer o Roles: Teacher – makes all pre-teaching decisions; provide feedback to observer Students – work in partners: one learner is the doer, the other is the observer who offers repeated, immediate feedback to the doer o Reasons: More student responsibility – enriching learning by engaging students in feedback Style D: Self-check o Def.: Performing a task and engaging in self-assessment o Roles: Teacher – makes all pre-teaching decisions Students – work independently & check own performance against the criteria prepared by teacher o Reasons: Provides more student responsibility
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Increases feedback quantity by T Helps learners realize value of self-assessment & honesty in self-assessment Style E: Inclusion o Def.:
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