Chapter 11 - This figure rose to 68 in 1990 and 72 in 1993...

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Sex at Work Chapter 11
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Sex Defined Sex refers to the biological differences between men and women
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Gender Gender refers to the culturally shaped characteristics associated with being a man or a woman
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Sexuality Sexuality is an important aspect of gender and refers to a person’s sexual self; those aspects of a person that make them sexually attractive to another
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Gender and Work Outcomes Association of types of work with ‘masculinity’ and ‘femininity’ The under-representation of women in the top echelons of organizations Pay inequities The use of sexuality to sell products and services Sexual harassment Prohibitions and norms against homosexuality
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Issues in Sex and Organizational Research Equity issues Sex, power, and authority issues Identity issues Research issues
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Women’s Earnings In the early 1980s, women in full-time employment earned approximately 64% of the average income earned by men
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Unformatted text preview: This figure rose to 68% in 1990 and 72% in 1993, dropped to 70% in 1994, and rose again to a new high of 73% in 1995 It rose to 81.6% in 2004 Industrial Spread of Women In 1982, 77% of the female workforce was concentrated in a few female-dominated industries (including nursing and related health occupations, clerical positions, or sales and service occupations) This figure dropped to 70% in 1994 (Statistics Canada, 1995), but it has remained the same since that point Female Led/Owned Businesses Between the late 1970s and the early part of the 21 st century, the number of women-owned businesses in Canada rose from just over 200,000 to 821,000 These female entrepreneurs “contribute in excess of $18 billion to the Canadian economy every year.” (R. Bastedo, “President’s Address, Ontario Club, February 8, 2006.”)...
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Chapter 11 - This figure rose to 68 in 1990 and 72 in 1993...

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