kkk.docx - KARTILYA NG KATIPUNAN By Emilio Jacinto In Readings in Philippine History Kartilya ng Katipunan About the Text \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 According to Jim

kkk.docx - KARTILYA NG KATIPUNAN By Emilio Jacinto In...

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KARTILYA NG KATIPUNAN By Emilio Jacinto In Readings in Philippine History
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Kartilya ng Katipunan About the Text: According to Jim Richardson, “Kartilya is the best known of all Katipunan texts” “…the only document of any length set in print by the Katipunan prior to August 1896 that is known to be still extant” Kartilya was printed as a small pamphlet for new members. (Cristobal 1997) Jim Richardson released a book entitled “The Light of Liberty”, allowing us to dig deeper with the primary source stated in his book. We can now read Jacinto’s Kartilya with other Katipunan texts, transcribed from difficult tagalog, freeing us, too, from deciphering the codes, as in the case of documents written in ciphers, penmanship common in that era.The Light of Liberty “ presents 73 Katipunan documents—56 of which have not yet been published in book form, 52 of which come from the Archivo General Militar de Madrid (AGMM). In other words, documents that the Spanish colonial regime confiscated from the revolutionaries and then managed to keep. The AGMM documents are particularly important for one more reason: None of them were used in the writing of the main books on the Katipunan that generations of Filipinos have grown up on, such as Teodoro Agoncillo’s “Revolt of the Masses.” Background of the Author: Name: Emilio Jacinto Historian accolade: “The Brain of Katipunan” Born: December 15, 1875 Died: April 16, 1898
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“Whether their skin be dark or white, all human persons are equal; one may be superior in knowledge, in wealth, in beauty, but not being a human. “- Emilio Jacinto. Kartilya ng Katipunan Emilio Jacinto was an eloquent and brave young man, known as both the soul and the brain of the Katipunan. In his short life, Jacinto helped to lead the fight for Filipino independence from Spain. Early life: We do know that Emilio Jacinto was born in Manila on December 15, 1875 , and he is a son of prominent merchant. As stated by MO1 (2011) in a blogsite mandirigma.com, Emilio receive a good education, and was fluent in both Tagalog and Spanish. He went to the San Juan de Letran College briefly. Deciding to study Law, He transferred to the University of Santo Tomas, where a future president of the Philippines was among his classmate that is Manuel L. Quezon. Jacinto was just 19 years old when news arrived that the Spanish had arrested his hero, Jose Rizal. Galvanized, the young man left school and joined with Andres Bonifacio and others to form the Katipunan, or “Highest and most respected society of the executed Rizal on trumped-up charges in December of 1896, The Katipunan rallied its followers to war. Revolution: Emilio Jacinto served as the spokesperson for the Katipunan, as well as handling its finances. Andres Bonifacio was not well educated, so he deferred to his young comrade on such matters. Jacinto wrote for the official Katipunan newspaper, the Kalayaan. He also penned the official handbook of the movement, called the Kartilya ng Katipunan. Despite his young age of just 21, Jacinto became a general in the group’s guerrilla army, taking an active role in the fight against the Spanish near Manila.
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