Social Cognition and perception.edited.docx - 1 Social Cognition How we think about Social World Student\u2019s Name Institutional Affiliation Course Date

Social Cognition and perception.edited.docx - 1 Social...

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1 Social Cognition: How we think about Social World Student’s Name Institutional Affiliation Course Date
2 Social Cognition and Social Perception Analysis Human beings are social creatures, at least in the natural sense. As a result, human beings are masters at interpreting new phenomenon or environment swiftly and accurately. By doing this, people can figure out the sequence of things happening in their surroundings, such as who is present, what is taking place currently, and what should take place. A good example is a student joining a course in a new school. In his/her mind, at that very point, the student had quick assumptions on the manner to behave and the role of everyone around them. It is highly unlikely that such student equated their environment to a party-like situation. Most importantly, these decisions often make subtly without them being conscious of the fact. Therefore in any given encounter, we tend to stop and reflect before making our judgment and impressions about our environment, people, and circumstances. The thought is referred to as automatic thinking since it occurs in an effortless, non-consciousness, involuntary, and unintentional fashion. People as Everyday Theorists The process of automatic thinking assists our manner of understanding new situations as we tend to relate to the unique situation with our previous experiences. For instance, when a person meets a person that is foreign to them or a visit to a new restaurant, we tend to think subconsciously what they might be like, or in the case of a restaurant, we straight away head to the counter and order. Given our prior experience, we behave in this manner as it is what is conventionally done in such places, interaction with objects and situations. Furthermore, in a study conducted by Kelley's, it was found that whenever we have a conviction that our schemas
3 are accurate, we tend to employ them to solve our situation; we do not conceptualize. For instance, it is perfectly natural to conceive that when a stranger orders a person in a dark alley, to remove their wallet, their most likely train of thought would be to react defensively, it is highly unlikely that the person would think that the stranger had an interest in looking at family photos. Factors Influencing Schemas usage Given that the social world is made of information that is difficult to conceptualize, and therefore it's left open to interpretation. We tend to adopt each schema to suit each scenario and, by extension, make out our conceptions to erratic behaviors of strangers around us. For example, strangers in a bus showing mixed signals such as singing, rocking back and forth could easily be interpreted as may be alcoholic or not a sane individual. Moreover, our various application of schemas is dependent on certain factors, such as accessibility. Accessibility refers to the extent that schemas and different concepts before our mind and therefore inform our subsequent application in making judgments that pertain to our social world.

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