Susan Christian

Susan Christian - Susan Christian 9/29/2011 Deadliest...

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Susan Christian 9/29/2011 Deadliest Knight: Don Quixote and the Knights of the Round Table Duke It Out in a No-Holds-Barred Death Match Miguel de Cervantes and the writers of Monty Python and the Holy Grail come from two thoroughly different times in history: one’s work thrived during the early 1600s, the other in the 1970s. However, both manage a very specific endeavor in that they satirize the age of knights and chivalrous code. In fact, some of the ways the two sides go about this are very similar. Both make use of anachronisms, both have tones of ridiculousness laced with serious reality, and both illustrate the tableau of knighthood as not one of misconceived idealism, but as knights whose true “pure” nature was put into question. One curious question, in addition to the comparison of these two stories, is to see who would make a better knight if both were placed in the medieval society of knights. As the discussion ensues over these stories, both characters from each story are given traits that exemplify themselves as knights respectively. In Don Quixote
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2011 for the course UNIV 1010 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '11 term at Acadia.

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Susan Christian - Susan Christian 9/29/2011 Deadliest...

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