Segment 1B Maltby - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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Unformatted text preview: Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The Copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyright material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction not be "used for any purposes other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. 1 You Have the Right to Remain Silent: Freedom of Speech in the Workplace Congress shall make no law abridging freedom of speech. -UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION Your boss can fire you for your politics, the books you read, or even the baseball team you root for, and there's usually nothing you can do about it. -PROFESSOR BRUCE BARRY, VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY Glen Hillier lost his job becauseheaskedapresidentialcandidatean embarrassing question at a public political rally. During the 2004 presidential campaign, Hillier, who worked at an advertising and design company, attended a rally for President Bush in West Vrrginia. He attempted to ask Bush a chal- lenging question about the war in Iraq. One of his company's customers, also at the rally, was offended by the implied criticism of Bush and told Hillier's boss. When Hillier carne to work the next day, he was fired. When Hillier called his lawyer, he was told that his boss had done nothing illegal. What happened to Hillier's freedom of speech? What Hillier didrit know is that, where his employer is concerned, he has no right to freedom of speech. The United States Constitution (including the Bill of Rights) applies only to the government. It does not apply to p.t;ivate businesses. A corporation can legally ignore the constitutional rights of its employees. You don't need to be a constitutional lawyer to understand this. The First 5 6 Can They Do That? Amendment says that "Congress shall make no law abridging freedom of speech~ It says nothing about what private parties can do, including private corporations.~ How could the founding fathers have made such a glaring oversight? The answer is that, at the birth of our nation, the problem didn't exist. The world in 1783 was vastly different from the one we live in today. Most people were self-employed. The few employers that existed were very small, typically farm owners or craftsmen who employed a few helpers. Such tiny enter~ prises didn't have the power to threaten the rights of citizens en masse. The founding fathers weren't worried about the abuse of power by Paul Revere's silversmith shop, and had no reason to be. The abuses of power they had experienced came from the government, and it was to this threat that they responded....
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Segment 1B Maltby - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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