Exposure to Poor Neighborhoods Change America

Exposure to Poor Neighborhoods Change America - Urban...

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http://usj.sagepub.com Urban Studies DOI: 10.1177/0042098008099362 2009; 46; 429 Urban Stud Xavier de Souza Briggs and Benjamin J. Keys Housing Locations in Two Decades Has Exposure to Poor Neighbourhoods Changed in America? Race, Risk and http://usj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/46/2/429 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Urban Studies Journal Limited can be found at: Urban Studies Additional services and information for http://usj.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://usj.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://usj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/46/2/429 Citations at UNIV OF ILLINOIS URBANA on March 30, 2009 http://usj.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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poverty in central-city neighbourhoods is an important part of the canonical understand- ing of economic restructuring in the US in the decades following the Second World War. This is particularly true for the analysis of Rust Belt cities and suburbs in the Northeast and Midwest in the 1970s and 1980s, but extreme poverty concentration—which few Has Exposure to Poor Neighbourhoods Changed in America? Race, Risk and Housing Locations in Two Decades Xavier de Souza Briggs and Benjamin J. Keys [Paper first received, August 2007; in final form, November 2007] Abstract While extreme concentrations of poor racial minorities, briefl y ‘rediscovered’ as a social problem by media in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, declined signiF cantly in the 1990s, no research has determined whether the trend reduced exposure to poor neighbourhoods over time or changed racial gaps in exposure. Yet most hypotheses about the social and economic risks of distressed neighbourhoods hinge on such exposure. Using a geocoded, national longitudinal survey matched to three censuses, it is found that: housing mobility continued to be the most important mode of exit from poor tracts for both Whites and Blacks; reductions for Blacks were mainly in exposure to extremely poor neighbourhoods, where neighbourhood change had a huge impact; Blacks remained far more likely than Whites to endure long, uninter- rupted exposure; and, racial gaps in the odds of falling back into a poor neighbour- hood after exiting one—a major driver of exposure duration that Black renters dominate—widened in the 1990s. Introduction As America’s cities and suburbs transform, are racial minorities more or less likely to be exposed to risky neighbourhoods over time? Thanks in large part to William Julius Wilson’s seminal work The Truly Disadvantaged (1987), the geographical concentration of minority 0042-0980 Print/1360-063X Online © 2009 Urban Studies Journal Limited DOI: 10.1177/0042098008099362 Xavier de Souza Briggs is in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room 9-521, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02139, USA.
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2011 for the course LER 110 taught by Professor Ashby during the Spring '11 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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Exposure to Poor Neighborhoods Change America - Urban...

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