Rough draft Section 114

Rough draft Section 114 - Ashley Fitzpatrick: U.S companies...

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Ashley Fitzpatrick: “U.S companies spend some $100 billion annually on training.” (Hair, 2009, pg. 250) “Unfortunately, some estimates indicate that only 10 to 30 percent of all training is being used on the job a month later, resulting in billions of wasted training dollars.” (Hair, 2009, pg. 250) This is one of the challenges that arise from training. Why does so much training go to waste? Well, much of the “training money goes to programs that aren’t necessary or focuses on problems that can’t be solved through training.” (Hair, 2009, pg. 251) Also, trainees are required to take courses that don’t have anything to do with their needs, managers forget to reinforce newly acquired skills, some training programs are poorly designed, and few managers evaluate their training programs. So, if we are to develop a training program for telecommuters, we have to make sure that money spent is not wasted, because more often than not, it is. Another part of this challenge is the actual cost of training itself. Training itself can cost anywhere from hundreds to thousands of dollars. In my research, I found that telecommuting actually saves companies significant amounts of money. “Underwritten by Cisco Systems Inc., the post-Telework Week report found that during that week, 39,694 employees teleworked, 86 percent of whom worked for the federal government. They collectively saved $2.7 million in commuting costs, and gained back more than 148,000 hours by not commuting, the report said.” (“What are some of the Current Best Practices for Telecommuting?”, 2011, pg. 1) Not only do companies save by cutting commuting costs, but additional costs are cut: “telecommuting employees often are more productive because they are not distracted by workplace socializing or office politics, sick leave can decrease because slightly ill employees will feel well enough to work from home, and others can work while caring for ill dependents, and overhead costs for parking spaces, office space, utilities, and supplies may decrease.” (“What are some of the Current Best Practices for
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Telecommuting?”, 2011, pg. 1) This means that if companies can correctly implement training programs and avoid all of the common mistakes, telecommuting can still be very profitable to their firms. A second challenge in telecommuter training is the difficulty that comes with scheduling a time and concrete place to train individuals. In my research, I found that first and foremost, “the company and the telecommuter can get off on the right foot by signing a telecommuting agreement that lists some or all of the following terms.” (“What are some of the Current Best Practices for Telecommuting?”, 2011, pg. 3) By describing in detail all of the responsibilities of the telecommuter, you ensure that he or she agrees to specific terms. An example that is pertinent to the challenge of scheduling is having an “agreement that attendance at on-site meetings, upon advance notice, is mandatory.” (“What are some of the Current Best Practices for
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Rough draft Section 114 - Ashley Fitzpatrick: U.S companies...

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