Lecture 1 HN 300-1 - WelcometoHN300 ScienceofFoods

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Welcome to HN 300  Science of Foods Instructor: Michael Staver, MS, PCC
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Quote from Alton Brown: “Food is about nothing if not chemistry,  physics, math, biology, botany, history,  geography, and anthropology—with a  little epidemiology thrown in for good  measure.  And the best part is that it all  leads to dinner.”
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Benefits of Food Science Enables food companies to provide a bounty of  food products that are convenient and pleasant  to eat Can increase the nutrient content of foods Enables longer shelf life of food products Creates crops that are resistant to insects,  drought, viruses, and/or fungi And much more
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Sometimes A Catch 22 Food Science developments have enabled  a plentiful and tempting food supply. Overindulgence of convenience foods, in  combination with sedentary lifestyles, has  contributed to the vast increase in obesity  in recent years.
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Key Issues Impacting the Food Industry Food Safety: Especially in the wake of 9/11  when the specter of possible terrorist actions has  accentuated the need for constant vigilance in  safeguarding food. Genetically Modified Organisms: Researchers are  continually at work to develop new crops with  beneficial qualities Functional Foods: Every day new research is  connecting the importance of certain food  components with health promotion.
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Consumer Demands are Ever-Changing and Evolving Changing   demographics —The population is aging due to the  Baby Boom Generation, older generations have a greater  percentage of females Melting Pot —With the ever increasing and diverse immigrant  population, we see a greater prevalence of ethnic foods. Timing of   Meals —Many Americans do not eat three meals per  day, they want access to prepared foods and snacks at work,  school, home , or anyplace in between. Preparation —The burden of preparing meals has shifted more  from the consumer to food companies.  Consumers are becoming  managers rather than cooks in many homes Health —The impact that food has on health continues to be a  major concern among American consumers.  Examples of factors influencing the food marketplace:
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Organic and Natural Foods Natural  = A food product made without  chemical or artificial additives Organic  = Legally defined as a plant or  animal food produced without using  growth hormones, antibodies, or  petroleum-based or sewage sludge-based  fertilizers
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What Organic Does  Not  Mean: The organic designation does  not imply that a food is more  nutrient dense than a food  without the organic designation.    
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2011 for the course HUMAN NUTR 300 taught by Professor Staver during the Spring '11 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lecture 1 HN 300-1 - WelcometoHN300 ScienceofFoods

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