Lecture 6 HN 300-3 - Fats and Oils HN 300 What we will...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fats and Oils HN 300
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What we will cover today: Overview of fats and oils The application of fats and oils in food products
Background image of page 2
Lipids in the Diet Lipids are organic molecules, most of which do not dissolve in water. Lipids contribute to texture, flavor, and aroma of our food. Some lipids are obvious in food, some are hidden. Lipids contribute to about 33% of the energy in the typical American diet.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lipid Metabolism: Fat for Fuel
Background image of page 4
American’s Changing Fat Intake 1960s: most fat came from high-fat cuts of beef, eggs, whole milk, butter, and cheese Since 1980s: American grocery shelves were flooded with reduced-fat products Actual amounts of fat consumed did not change Reducing fat without reducing kcals did not promote weight loss nor prevent heart disease and cancer.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fat Intake and Health Diets high in fat from animal products increase risk for heart disease and certain types of cancer Diets high in processed fats also increase risks Diets high in unsaturated fats seem to be protective
Background image of page 6
Lipids and Health Too little fat: Essential fatty acid deficiency Too much total fat and too much “bad” fat Cardiovascular disease Cancer Obesity
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Dietary Fat and Heart Disease Buildup of fatty material in the artery walls cause atherosclerosis
Background image of page 8
Overview: Lipids First: What is a lipid? A lipid is defined as an organic compound composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen or any fat soluble (hydrophobic) naturally occurring molecule. Broad definition which refers to free fatty acids, mono-, di-, and tri- glycerides, phospholipids, and other fat-soluble, sterol- containing metabolites such as cholesterol
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Simple Fats Most common lipid class found in food products Two components: Glycerol Fatty Acids These two components link together to form an ester
Background image of page 10
Types of Lipids—Triacylglycerol (Triglyceride)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Glycerol Gray = carbon Red = oxygen White = hydrogen Pink = lone electron pairs associated with oxygen (tuning fork arrangement)
Background image of page 12
Glycerol Defined A polyhydric alcohol containing three carbon atoms, each of which is joined to a hydroxyl (alcohol or—OH) group Each of the hydroxyl groups can esterify with a different fatty acid, therefore there is a large range of possible molecules of simple fats
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fatty Acids Provide the variable component of the simple fat molecule Are defined as organic acids containing usually between 4 and 24 carbon atoms Contain a characteristic carboxyl group
Background image of page 14
Example of a Fatty Acid: Butyric Acid Another way of representing this molecule: CH 3 (CH 2 ) 2 COOH Or the shorthand designation: 4:0
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Common Types of Fatty Acids in Foods: Common Name Carbon Atoms Double Bonds Approx. Melting Pt.
Background image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 74

Lecture 6 HN 300-3 - Fats and Oils HN 300 What we will...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 17. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online