Lecture 8 HN 300-1 - Meats, Fish, and Poultry and Eggs HN...

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Meats, Fish, and Poultry and Eggs HN 300
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Categories of Flesh Foods Meat Poultry Fish
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Meat All red meats are from animal sources Beef Veal Pork Lamb Mutton (mature sheep)
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Poultry Fowl Turkey Chicken Duck Pheasant Other, less available fowl
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Fish Broad defintion: aquatic animals More narrow classification: fish with fins, gills, a backbone, and a skull Shellfish: sub classification of fish; includes mollusks and crustaceans Mollusks: shellfish with a protective shell Crustaceans: shellfish with an exoskeleton; shrimp, lobsters, crabs, etc.
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Structure of Meats, Fish, and Poultry Structure includes: Muscle Tissue Connective Tissue Fat
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Muscle Tissue Components: 75 % water 18% protein 4-10% fat 1% carbohydrate in the form of glycogen and some glucose and glucose-6-phosphate Trace amounts of vitamins, minerals, organic compounds Specific composition varies from muscle to muscle and between carcasses
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Proteins in Muscle Myosin: principle myofibrillar protein Actin: Myofibrillar protein existing in two forms, F and G Tropomyosin: Least abundant of the three principle myofibrillar proteins Actomyosin: muscle protein formed from the union of actin and myosin Formed by reversible reaction catalyzed by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the presence of Ca and Mg Enzymes: Adenosine triphosphotase (drops pH, triggering rigor mortis), pyrophosphatase, cathepsins, calcium-activated factor
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Muscle Proteins
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Organization of Muscle Structure Muscle: Consists of thousands of muscle fibers, the cellular units of muscle
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Organization of Muscle Muscle fiber: Each muscle fiber is made up of thousands of myofibrils
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Organization of Muscle Myofibril : Myofibrils contain myofilaments of actin and myosin. The filaments form an ordered array and make up sarcomeres, the functional units of muscle.
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Organization of Muscle Actin and Myosin : According to the sliding filament theory, myosin heads bind actin filaments and move them during contraction. The micrograph shows myosin bound to actin, supporting this theory.
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Organization of Muscle Thick Myofilaments: The thicker, longer type of myofilament; composed of myosin molecules joined together to form a screw- like, thick, and elongated filament Thin Myofilaments: Thin filament formed by the helical twisting of two strands of polymerized actin
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The Sarcomere
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Hierarchical Organization of Muscle
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More on the Sarcomere Z lines = region in a myofibril where the thin filaments of actin adjoin, creating a dark line that defines the end of a sarcomere I band = Light region on either side of the z line in a sarcomere, consisting of non-overlapping myofilaments of actin H band = region in the center of the sarcomere where only thick myofilaments of myosin occur A band = total portion of the sarcomere in which thick and thin
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Organization of Muscle Sarcoplasm: Jellylike protein surrounding the myofibrils in muscle fibers Sarcolemma: Thin, transparent membrane surrounding the bundle of myofibrils that constitute a fiber
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2011 for the course HUMAN NUTR 300 taught by Professor Staver during the Spring '11 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lecture 8 HN 300-1 - Meats, Fish, and Poultry and Eggs HN...

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