Food and Culture HN202

Food and Culture HN202 - Food and Culture HN 202 Chef...

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Food and Culture HN 202 Chef Michael Staver mstaver@uic.edu
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Influences on Food and Culture Geography Religion Genetics Ethnic background
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Influences on Food and Culture Immigration Food allergies, for example lactose intolerance Environmental factors
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Culture What is culture? Culture is a term used by social scientists for a people's whole way of life. In everyday conversation the word 'culture' may refer to activities in such fields as art, literature, and music.
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Culture To social scientists, a people's culture consists of all the ideas, objects, and ways of doing things created by the group. Culture includes arts, beliefs, customs, inventions, language, technology and traditions.
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Culture The term 'civilization' is similar, but it refers mostly to scientifically more advanced ways of life. A culture is any way of life, simple or complex.
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Culture Continued What are basic elements of all cultures? All cultures have features that result from basic needs shared by all people. Every culture has methods of obtaining food and shelter.
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Culture Continued Every culture has ways to protect itself against invaders. It also has family relationships including forms of marriage and systems of kinship. A culture has religious beliefs and a set of practices to
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Culture All societies have forms of artistic expression such as carving, painting and music. In addition, all cultures have some type of scientific knowledge.
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Culture Continued This knowledge may be folklore about the plants people eat and the animals they hunt, or it may be a highly
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Culture Continued How do cultures differ? Cultures differ in their details from one part of the world to another. For example, eating is a biological need.
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Culture Continued What people eat, when and how they eat, and how food is prepared differ from culture to culture.
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Culture Continued When did culture develop and how? The foundation for human culture developed in the prehistoric times.
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Culture Some important steps were (1) the development of tools, (2) the start of farming, (3) the growth of cities, and (4) the development of
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Culture Continued Hunters/Gatherers. The ancestors of human beings lived by gathering fruit, insects and edible leaves and by catching small animals with their hands.
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Culture Humans took the first steps toward the development of culture at least 5 million years ago, when they learned to make and use tools.
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Culture Continued Many of the earliest tools were sharp-edged rocks used for cutting and scraping. The sharp edge was produced by hitting or grinding one rock with another.
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Culture Continued Farmers/Villages. By a little more than 2 1/2 million years ago the earliest human beings had developed and had learned to hunt large animals.
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With better hunting, the food
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2011 for the course HUMAN NUTR 2 taught by Professor Staver during the Fall '11 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Food and Culture HN202 - Food and Culture HN 202 Chef...

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