PPE midterm X

PPE midterm X - 1. What is the difference between Popper's...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. What is the difference between Popper's recommendations and Platt's? (Two sentences should suffice.) (5 points) Popper believes that the best theories are bold conjectures ones that could be falsifiable. Platt believes that a strong inference is important. Platt would say that one should essentially play “20 questions” with the world, starting off with basic questions and narrowing down our tests. Platt disagrees with Popper in that bold (unlikely) conjectures are not necessarily the best. 2. When should the outcome of the decision affect your evaluation of the decision itself? When should the outcome not affect your evaluation? (5) Whether a decision is good or bad depends on how you made it, now what happened. The focus is on whether a decision is good or bad depends on how you made it, not what happened. When I make a decision in a certain moment, I have information X,Y,Z at my disposal. After the outcome, I may not have A,B,C as well as X,Y,Z at my disposal. I will use A,B,C,X,Y,Z when making future decisions, but the evaluation of the decision in the original should not affect my original decision in hindsight. One should evaluate a decision with coherence and correspondence with which the decision was made, not the outcome. The outcome should only effect your decision in the future, using your new logic and reason. Nevertheless, as a creative exercise in psychology, bad outcomes tend to lead to lead to better decision making in the future. If there is a bad outcome, you will reflect and ask, what did I do wrong in my normative decision process and how can I alter this so that it does not happen in the future? Good outcomes rarely induce this kind of reflection. Therefore, a good outcome rarely affects your initial evaluation. However, a good or bad outcome should not affect your evaluation of the decision itself, but it should in the future. Bad decisions can lead to good decisions in the future. At the end of the day. Decisions are what we control, outcomes are what happened. 3. Describe a heuristic that explains a bias or error, and a useful
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/23/2011 for the course PPE 253 taught by Professor Mellers during the Fall '11 term at UPenn.

Page1 / 4

PPE midterm X - 1. What is the difference between Popper's...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online