2006_74-78 - The Journal of Cr edibility Assessment and...

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The Journal of Credibility Assessment and Witness Psychology 2006, Vol. 7, No. 2, 74-78 74 The Journal of Credibility Assessment and Witness Psychology 2006, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 74-78 Published by Boise State University The Use of Voice in Security Evaluations Harry Hollien and James Harnsberger Institute for the Advanced Study of Communication Processes, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Copyright 2006 Boise State University and the Authors. Permission for non-profit electronic dissemination of this article is granted. Reproduction in hardcopy/print format for educational purposes or by non-profit organizations such as libraries and schools is permitted. For all other uses of this article, prior advance written permission is required. Send inquiries by hardcopy to: Charles R. Honts, Ph. D., Editor, The Journal of Credibility Assessment and Witness Psychology , Department of Psychology, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, Idaho 83725, USA.
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The Journal of Credibility Assessment and Witness Psychology 2006, Vol. 7, No. 2, 74-78 75 The Use of Voice in Security Evaluations Introduction It is first necessary to study and understand psychological stress as it is reflected in phonatory output. One problem to be faced is that stress is most often defined on the basis of the particular stressor involved. Actually, stress should be defined as a psychological response to a perceived or actual threat (as modified by coping behavior). o Unfortunately most research on vocal stress has been based on the former assumption -- not a useful approach. Stress and Voice Model The model in Figure 1 has been gleaned from data analysis and the distillation of the available literature. Included is our own research. It involves curves of four acoustic (voice) parameters as they shift from low stress utterances through normal speech to that reflecting high stress. They are: o SFF or speaking fundamental frequency: This factor tends to rise with stress due to muscle tension and increased pulmonic airflow.
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