Lecture 3 Acoustics_VT

Lecture 3 Acoustics_VT - LIN 4930 Acoustics of the Vocal...

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LIN 4930 Acoustics of the Vocal Tract
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Vibration Two types of vibration: Free: A given mass (e.g,. the tuning fork) always vibrates at the same frequency (or frequencies); this is the natural frequency of the mass. The amplitude of that vibration depends on applied force. Forced: A mass (e.g., surrounding air molecules) vibrates at the frequency of the source of motion The amplitude of that vibration depends on applied force and the applied frequency.
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Forced Vibration The amplitude of the forced vibration depends in part on applied frequency because If a mass is forced to vibrate at its natural frequency, the vibration will have greater amplitude than at another frequency. When a mass is forced to vibrate at or near its natural frequency, we refer to this as resonance Resonator: Something set into vibration by another vibration Ex: Air forced into vibration by vibration of a tuning fork Analogy: Air in vocal tract forced into vibration by vibration of the vocal folds
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2011 for the course LIN 4930 taught by Professor Habib,r during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture 3 Acoustics_VT - LIN 4930 Acoustics of the Vocal...

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