Lecture 5 Acoustics_Speech_Sounds_2

Lecture 5 Acoustics_Speech_Sounds_2 - LIN 4930 Acoustics...

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LIN 4930 Acoustics Cues for Speech Sounds 2: Sonorant Consonants and Vowels
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Sonorant Consonants Sonorant Consonants resemble vowels acoustically and articulatorily Nasal stop consonants [ ], [ ], [ ] Approximant consonants [ ] [ ] or [ ] [ ] [ ] Liquids Glides lateral
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Nasals Nasals are characterized by several properties of the nasal murmur: a high-intensity low-frequency “nasal formant” in the vicinity of 250-300 Hz low-amplitude, wide bandwidth higher-frequency formants zeros or anti-formants whose frequencies vary with place, as well as nasalization into and out of the murmur. [ 
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nose mouth p h a r y n x Nasals Nasals involve a side-branch resonator. Side-branch resonators introduce zeros (anti- resonances) due to impedance (opposition to sound transmission). The frequency of the zeros
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2011 for the course LIN 4930 taught by Professor Habib,r during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture 5 Acoustics_Speech_Sounds_2 - LIN 4930 Acoustics...

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