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Lecture 14 Speech and Deception 2

Lecture 14 Speech and Deception 2 - LIN 4930 Speech and...

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LIN 4930 Speech and Deception 2
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Credibility Assessment Psychological stress has traditionally been classified as an emotional state and at one end of an arousal continuum on which many emotions can be oriented Psychological stress, in turn, is taken as the underlying basis several of the cues that could be used detecting deception in speech and voice
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Behaviors / Cognitive States During Deception Arousal Increased heart rate Increased breathing rate Increased perspiration Greater pupil dilation More blinking Feelings of guilt or fear Less eye contact More fidgeting
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Behaviors / Cognitive States During Deception Increased cognitive load Lies involving creating a story as opposed to recalling a past episode Lies must be internally consistent Cued by: Longer response latencies, more hesitations, fewer hand movements to illustrate speech Greater control over verbal and nonverbal behavior Less spontaneous
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Cues to Deception (DePaulo et al, 2003)
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