UF_Report_03_17_2006

UF_Report_03_17_2006 - FINAL REPORT CIFA CONTRACT FA...

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FINAL REPORT CIFA CONTRACT – FA 4814-04-0011 Voice Stress Analyzer Instrumentation Evaluation Harry Hollien, Ph.D. James D. Harnsberger, Ph.D. Investigators IASCP, University of Florida Gainesville, Florida March 17, 2006
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TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover Page Table of Contents Introduction Background 3 T a s k 4 G o a l s 5 M o d e l 6 Laboratory-based studies 6 F i e l d S t u d i e s 7 A c t u a l F i e l d R e s e a r c h 7 Application of Obtained Materials 7 Methods 8 The Laboratory Level Research 8 P r o t o c o l s 8 Database Development 13 T e s t i n g C V S A 1 4 T e s t i n g L V A 1 5 F i e l d R e s e a r c h 1 6 SERE Study Characteristics 16 P r o c e d u r e s 1 6 R e s u l t s 1 7 Organization of the Results 17 CVSA Analyses – General 17 C V S A C h a r t s 1 8 LVA Research – General 19 S u m m a r y R e s u l t s 2 0 VSA Core Study: The IASCP Team CVSA Data 21 VSA Core Study: The NITV Team CVSA Data 23 VSA Core Study: The Phonetician Team CVSA Data 24 SERE Field Study: CVSA Data 26 VSA Core Study: The IASCP Team LVA Data 27 VSA Core Study: The V Team LVA Results 28 T e c h n i c a l R e s u l t s 2 9 CVSA Testing with VSA Database: IASCP Team 29 CVSA Testing with VSA Database: NITV Team 32 CVSA Testing with VSA Database: Phonetician Team 34 CVSA Testing with SERE Database: All Teams 36 Interpretation of CVSA Testing 38 LVA Testing with VSA Database: IASCP Team 39 LVA Testing with VSA Database: V Team 41 Interpretation of LVA Testing 43 Discussion and Conclusions 44 R e f e r e n c e s 4 6 A p p e n d i c e s 5 0 2
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Background Perspective It is well known that the speech signal contains features which can be used to provide information about a human speaker. “Voice identification” is based on one of these sets of features as numerous speaker specific phonatory properties have been discovered (see among many others: Hollien, 1990, 2002; Hollien and Schwartz, 2002; Kuenzel, 1994; Nolan, 1983; Stevens, 1971). Another such area involves the detection of alcohol intoxication as it is reflected in voice and speech. Here too, a substantial amount of research has been reported which describes these relationships (see among many others: Chin and Pisoni, 1997; Hollien et al, 1998, 2001 a and b; Klingholtz et al, 1988; Pisoni and Martin, 1997). Human emotion (including psychological stress) constitutes yet a third domain where behaviors can be detected in voice (see among others: Cummings and Clements, 1980; Hicks and Hollien, 1981; Hollien, 1980, 1990; Scherer, 1981, 1986; Williams and Stevens, 1972). The neurological bases for the relationships described above also are reasonably well established. That is, since the speech act represents the output of a number of high level and integrated neurological systems (sensory, cognitive, motor), it appears appropriate to assume that the process may reflect a variety of other conditions. Specifically, since the oral production of any language involves the use of multiple sensory modalities, high level cognitive functioning, complex
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UF_Report_03_17_2006 - FINAL REPORT CIFA CONTRACT FA...

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