3 - 3.1 Steady State and Transient State If you heat a pan...

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Unformatted text preview: 3.1 Steady State and Transient State If you heat a pan on a stove, it takes a while for the pan to heat up to cooking temperature, after which the temperature of the pan remains relatively constant. The latter state is called the steady state , where there is no temporal change in temperatures. When the system is still changing with time, it is in transient state . The rate of conduction through an object at steady-state is given by: (Eq. 3.1) where k is the conductivity of the material, A is the cross-sectional area through which the heat is conducting, and T is the temperature difference between two surfaces separated by a distance x . 3.2 One-Dimensional Conduction One-dimensional heat transfer refers to special cases where there is only one spatial variable the temperature varies in one direction only. A model used often to calculate the heat transfer through a 1-D system is called the direction only....
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2011 for the course ENGINEERIN 251 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Bangladesh University of Eng and Tech.

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3 - 3.1 Steady State and Transient State If you heat a pan...

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