11-Appalachian Communitiest

11-Appalachian Communitiest - Welcome to HUMANITIES 1704...

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Welcome to HUMANITIES 1704 Introduction to Appalachian Studies Dr. Stevan R. Jackson
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Appalachian Communities Appalachian communities were made up of a  variety of types of people – coal miners, textile  workers, farmers, city workers, housewives,  teachers, bus drivers, etc.  
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Appalachian Communities Arnold Toynbee discussed the stereotypical  Appalachian community and individual.   Toynbee, a preeminent British historian who  apparently had never been to Appalachia,  wrote a 12- volume work entitled  A Study of  History  (1935) in which he included the  following  statement:
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Appalachian Communities “The Appalachian mountain people at this day  are no better than barbarians. They are the  American counterparts of the latter-day White  barbarian of the Old World,  the Rifis and Kurds  and the Hairy Ainu.”   relative isolation of the 1800s, until very late  into the twentieth century. The communities overall change slowly during  the late 1900s.  Large migration patterns often bypassed small  places. 
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The  pace of change in Appalachian  communities accelerated after 1945 (the end of  World War II). This was a pivotal period in the  growth of America in general. Even though Appalachia didn’t grow  economically like the rest of America, there  was a slow change in the community from the  1960s on. 
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 throughout all of Appalachia there was quite a bit  of diversity, communities themselves had a  relatively homogeneous makeup of the people.  After all, whites tended to have their  neighborhoods and blacks had their  neighborhoods, and so forth. Some communities and even towns were lily  white and worked hard to stay that way.  Places  like Erwin, Tennessee had a reputation of  maintaining only a white population.  Many  places were quite conservative politically and  economically
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Besides the physical mountains that make one  conserve ecologically , there are many political  precedents to making the people conservative  in that aspect as well. Many  small communities were staunch  Federalists, meaning that they wanted a strong  Federal  government to protect them nationally  but also they didn’t want the Federal  government in their local business,  sort of anti- Federalist at the same time. 
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Many communities were conservative in the  free blacks and other outsiders hurt the poor  free(white) workers by taking jobs away from  them. 
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Many Appalachian communities were hurt  during the Civil War by experiencing high  taxes, a smallpox epidemics, and deserters  turned outlaws .
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2011 for the course HUM 1704 taught by Professor Srjackson during the Fall '11 term at Virginia Tech.

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11-Appalachian Communitiest - Welcome to HUMANITIES 1704...

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