Chapter+7+-+Pragmatics

Chapter+7+-+Pragmatics - 7 Pragmatics GET FUZZY: Darby...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
7 Pragmatics GET FUZZY: © Darby Conley!Dist. by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
7.0 What Is Pragmatics? I n chapter 6, semantics was defined as the study of meaning. Given such a definition, it is tempting to suspect that once we understand the semantics of a language, we will automatically understand the meaning of any utterance in that language. In fact, how- ever, identifying the semantic contribution of words and sentences gets us only partway to understanding what an utterance means. Why? The context in which a sentence is uttered may critically affect the m.eaningthat tilt: speaker intends! Pragmatics is the study-ofthe wayspeoplt: use language inatfual conversations. Prag- maticists study both how context helps to determine whether a particular utterance is appropriate or inappropriate as well as how changes to context alter sentences' meanings. Contents 7.1 Language in Context ExploresseverallVtlYs in which context can affect themeaningo(titterqnces, and introduces the idea offelicit)? or the appropriateness ()fan utterance in discoursf4. 7.2 Rules of Conversation Discusses why conversation must follow rules, and introduces Grices maxims for cooperative conversation. 7.3 Drawing Conclusions Builds on File 7.2, showing ways in which language users may employ context to conveyor derive meaning that is not partofan utterance's entailed meaning. 7.4 Speech Acts Outlines many ofthe jobs that speakers accomplish with language and the ways in which accomplish them. 7.5 Presupposition Discusses another precondition for felicity. 7.6 Practice Provides exercises, discussion questions, and activities related to pragmatics. 268
Background image of page 2
7.1 Language in Context 7.1.1 The Importance of Context We may often hear someone use a quotation-for example, in defense ofa political opin- ion or a religiousviewpoint-only to hear someone else counter, "But that'snot really what he (the original speaker) meant! You've taken it completelyoutofcontext!" We also become frustrated when something we have said is taken out of context, feeling as though we have been misquoted. We know intrinsically that to ignore the original context of an utterance can misrepresent the speaker's intentions. Experiences likethese tell us that context can af- fect an utterance's meaning. One ofthe jobs of pragmatics is to investigate the relationship between context and meaning. 7.1.2 Sentences and Utterances In order to investigate this relationship, we need a way to talk about language in context. Pragmaticists therefore distinguish between sentences .and utterances. A sentence is the group of words used to express some (complete) idea. Consider a sentence like There is a platypus in the bathtub. We knowmany things about this sentence: it is a sentence of English; it contains seven words; it has a certain syntactic Structure; and so on. However, while we are able to describe such properties of a sentence, sentences are abstract entities.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 42

Chapter+7+-+Pragmatics - 7 Pragmatics GET FUZZY: Darby...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online