ChIV.Starting.Vortex - AE 3003 Chapter IV. Handout #2 How...

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Unformatted text preview: AE 3003 Chapter IV. Handout #2 How does the airfoil develop lift? In the previous handouts, we demonstrated that a vortex solution is essential for generating circulation and lift. For some bodies (cylinder, sphere, baseball, golf ball, tennis ball) circulation may be generated by spinning the body. How about airfoils? How is the vortex generated? Where is it stored? Is the vortex strength unique? To answer these questions, we need to look at the flow over an airfoil when it has impulsively started from rest. At time t=0+ (i.e. shortly after the flow starts), the streamlines look as follows: In the above figure, there are two stagnation points, one on the lower surface near the nose, and the second on the upper surface near the trailing edge. Some of the flow will have to go around the trailing edge from the bottom surface to the top, before eventually leaving the airfoil. Because of viscosity, rotation develops at the solid surface and vorticity develops. On the upper surface, the vorticity will be generally clockwise. On the lower surface, the vorticity will be generally surface, the vorticity will be generally clockwise....
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2011 for the course AE 3003 taught by Professor Yeung during the Fall '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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ChIV.Starting.Vortex - AE 3003 Chapter IV. Handout #2 How...

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