EML4450L5

EML4450L5 - Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering...

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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter Sustainable Energy: The Solar Strategy (Continued from Lecture 4)
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter 1980 1990 2000 Wind Energy Potential Globally: 27% of earth’s land surface is class 3 (250-300 W/m 2 at 50 m) or greater - potential of 50 TW 4% utilization of > class 3 land area will provide 2 TW US: 6% of land suitable for wind energy development - 0.5 TW US electricity consumption ~ 0.4 TW Off shore installations provide additional resource Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson, Evaluation of Global Wind Power, Stanford University, 2005
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter Global Wind Energy Growth
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter 2005 World Total: 59,322 MW 2005 Installations : 11,679 MW Growth rate: 25% 2020 Prediction: 1,245,000 MW* Equivalent to 1000 Nuclear power plants 12% of world electricity generation Global Wind Energy Country 2005 MW % of total Germany 18,428 31.0 Spain 10,027 16.9 United States 9,149 15.4 India 4,430 7.5 Denmark 3,122 5.3 Italy 1,717 2.9 United Kingdom 1,353 2.3 China 1,260 2.1 Japan 1,231 2.1 Netherlands 1,219 2.1 * According to Wind Force 12
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter Wind Power GE WIND 1.5 MW GE WIND 3.6 MW
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter Boeing 747-200 GE 3.6 MW Large Scale Wind Turbine
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter Levelized cents/kWh in constant $2000 1 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 COE cents/kWh 45 30 15 Wind Energy Costs Trends Source: NREL Energy Analysis Office 1 These graphs are reflections of historical cost trends NOT precise annual historical data. Updated: June 2002
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter States with most wind energy installed, by capacity (MW) 1 California - 2,096 MW 2 Texas - 1,293 MW 3 Minnesota - 615 MW 4I o w a - 6 3 2 M W 5W y o m i n g - 2 8 5 M W US Wind Energy Installations Largest wind farms operating the U.S. (MW) 1 Stateline, Oregon-Washington - 300 MW 2 King Mountain, Texas - 278 MW 3 New Mexico Wind Energy Center, New Mexico - 204 MW 4 Storm Lake, Iowa - 193 MW 5 Colorado Green, Colorado - 162 MW 6 High Winds, California - 162 MW
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S ustainable E nergy S cience and E ngineering C enter Biomass is a widely used term referring to a number of biosolids and organic materials. Depending on the geographical and political context, the term “biomass” is also used for different purposes. Biomass can be defined as: - Plant and other growing species capable of being used as fuel. - Organic material mainly composed of carbohydrate and lignin compounds, the building blocks of which are the elements carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. - Stored form of solar energy relying on the process of photosynthesis Some examples of biomass are: Fuel wood; Tree barks; Sugar cane bagasse, Wheat straw Switch grass; Corn cobs; Rice hull; Vineyard pruning Coconut shells and Almond shell Biomass Source: http://www.energy.kth.se/compedu/webcompedu/index.html
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2011 for the course EML 4450 taught by Professor Greska during the Fall '06 term at FSU.

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EML4450L5 - Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering...

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