Emat - Range of potential total destruction Group Question...

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Range of potential total destruction
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Group Question (5) What impacts would a VEI 8 eruption of Yellowstone have on the citizens of Florida?
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Santorini circa 1650 BC, VEI 6 http://www.santorini.net/caldera.html
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EARTH MATERIALS
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Mineral: naturally occurring inorganic solid with a defined chemical composition and specific crystalline structure.
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Earth Materials
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Native elements - containing a single element (ex. Gold - Au, Graphite - C) Oxides - O2- (ex. Hematite - Fe2O3) Hydroxides - containing OH- (ex. Brucite - Mg[OH]2) Halides - containing F-, Cl-, Br-or I- (ex. Halite - NaCl) Carbonates - containing CO32- (ex. Calcite - CaCo3) Phosphates - containing PO43- (ex. Apatite - Ca5[PO4]3F) Sulfates - containing SO42- (ex. Gypsum - CaSO4 . 2H2O) Sulfides - containing S- (ex. Pyrite - FeS2) Silicates - containing SiO4-4 (ex. Olivine - Mg2SiO4)
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Polymorphs: Some groups of minerals share a common chemical composition but differ in terms of crystalline structure. Polymorphs like graphite and diamond (both composed of carbon) illustrate the significance of crystalline structure to physical properties: graphite (a component of common pencil lead) is soft and opaque black while diamond is very hard and a beautiful gem.
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2011 for the course GLY 1000 taught by Professor Parker during the Spring '11 term at FSU.

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Emat - Range of potential total destruction Group Question...

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