Coastal Processes

Coastal Processes - Coastal Processes Coastal Understanding...

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Coastal Processes Coastal Processes Understanding coastal processes is important when trying to preserve and protect beaches In Florida, 75% of the population (10.5 million) live within 10 miles of the coast
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Waves are present along all coastlines, and are created by wind blowing over the ocean Wave action is responsible for the presence of well- sorted, well-rounded sands along the beach. Waves are often the main agent of erosion As waves approach the shoreline they grow in height and eventually break. The zone where they break is termed the surf zone
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As a wave crest approaches an irregular coastline it bends. This is called wave refraction , which causes wave energies to be concentrated at headlands and dispersed at bays
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Waves approaching a shoreline at an angle cause two important processes Longshore Drift – the gradual lateral movement of sand along the beach Longshore Current – a shallow-water current parallel to the shore
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Tides are another process that occurs along
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2011 for the course GLY 1000 taught by Professor Parker during the Spring '11 term at FSU.

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Coastal Processes - Coastal Processes Coastal Understanding...

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