History I – Test 3

History I – Test 3 - HistoryITest3...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
History I – Test 3 Chapter 9 - Study Guide p. 243-270 Carruca 244, 245 Aratum 245 Three field system 246 Peasantry in the High Middle Ages 246-247 Aristocracy in the High Middle Ages 248-251 Venice 251, 256 Genoa 251 Pisa 251 Flanders 251-252 borough 254 bourgeosie 254 commune 255, 256 city governments 255-256 consuls 255 patricians 255 Medieval industry 259 Medieval universities 259-262 Classical Antiquity 262-263
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Scholasticism 263-265 Realists 263 Nominalists 263 Thomas Aquinas 264-265 Literature in the High Middle Ages 265-266 Romanesque architecture 266-268 Gothic cathedrals 267-268 Peter Abelard 263 University of Paris 260 guilds 259 Mini-Lecture The High Middle Ages occurred from approximately 1000-1300 AD and was a period of  growth and revival for western civilization. The climate improved providing more  productive growing seasons. The European population doubled. This can possibly be  attributed to abundance of food as well as increased security as people became more  settled and experienced fewer invasions. Forests were cleared for cultivation and the  carrruca or heavy wheeled plow made with the use of iron was put into use. Also in  addition to water wheels Europeans began to use the windmill for power.  Peasants made up the bulk of the population. Life for them revolved around planting,  harvesting and preserving food as well as tending the animals. Festivals of the Catholic  Church, Sunday mass, baptisms, funerals and marriages were the focus of social life.  The three field system allowed for crop rotation that made better use of the land. As the  population increased lords tried to grow more food by leasing land to free peasants who  had previously been serfs. The peasants paid rent and were no longer legally bound to 
Background image of page 2
the land. Lords became less powerful and monarchs became more powerful. Peasants lived in simple cottages, many times only one room, with thatched roofs. No  windows or chimneys made necessary a hole in the roof for smoke to escape from the  hearth used for warmth and cooking. Peasants ate a diet of bread, peas, beans, cheese  and pork. Sometimes game was acquired from hunting or nuts, berries and fruit from  gathering. Consumption of alcohol was extensive probably accounting for many  accidents of that time. In the aristocracy, men were divided into men of war, the landowners who maintained  their fighting skills and men of the cloth who were the leaders in the church. The nobility  built secure castles with thick walls for defense and comfortable living quarters inside.  When there was no war, men fought in tournaments to keep up their fighting skills. Children were taught to follow adult roles with girls learning to run a household and boys 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

History I – Test 3 - HistoryITest3...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online