History II – Test 3

History II – Test 3 - HistoryIITest3...

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History II – Test 3 Chapter 23 - Study Guide  p. 698-730 Second Industrial Revolution 699-705 chemical production in late 19th and early 20th century 699 electricity 699 internal combustion engine 699 tariffs 700 cartels 701 Henry Ford 700 Gottlieb Daimler 700 late 19th and early 20th century factories 699-702 economic zones in Europe 702 world economy 703-704 opportunities for women 704-705, 720, 707-708 new white collar jobs 704-705, 715 Socialist parties 705-707 Marxism 706 Karl Marx 705, 686-688, 753 Eduard Bernstien 706-707 Communist Manifesto 686-680 Social Democratic Party 705-706, 726 Contagious Diseases Act 705 Marxist Social Democratic Labor Party 706 evolutionary socialism 706
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trade unions 707-708 anarchists 708 mass society 708-722 Edwin Chadwick 710 621-622 Public Health Act 711 Octavia Hill 711, 713 V. A. Huber 711 Rudolf Virchow 710 Solomon Neumann 710 Lord Leverhulme 711 Housing Act of 1890 711-712 Ebenezer Howard 712 plutocrats 713-714 aristocrats 713-714 Bertha Krupp 714 education in mass society 714, 717,  719-721 William Gladstone 723-724 Reform Act of 1884 723 Irish Land League 723 Charles Parnell 723 home rule 723 Paris commune 723-724 Louis Michel 724-725 Chamber of Deputies 724
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Spanish American War 724, 759 William II 726, 727 Otto von Bismarck 723, 726-727 Alexander II 727 Alexander III 727 Chamber of Deputies  ? Francis Joseph 726 Dual Monarchy 726 Chapter 23 Mini Lecture  The late nineteenth century was characterized by a Second Industrial Revolution. New industries, new sources of  energy and new goods led westerners to believe that they had entered an era of progress that would solve all  human problems. Steel, chemicals, electricity as a new energy source, and petroleum opened up new  possibilities. The first internal combustion engine was produced in 1878.  Whereas England had led the way in the first Industrial Revolution, it was now passed by Germany. The United  States in turn passed Germany. For western nations, protective tariffs assured that domestic markets were  available for products made nationally. Chemical and electrical products, larger factories and the use of electricity for energy revolutionized much of the  industrialized world. New products combined with consumerism to create new markets. New products dependent  on electricity, for instance, included lightbulbs, street cars and new machine tools. In the same period, the internal combustion engine was the foundation of new kinds of transportation as well as  warfare equipment. Among these were automobiles, airplanes and tanks. In Europe, Germany became the industrial leader after 1870. By 1910, steel production in Germany doubled that 
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History II – Test 3 - HistoryIITest3...

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