History II Test 2

History II Test 2 - Chapter19StudyGuide 571603 Bastille...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 19 Study Guide  571-603 Bastille 571, 579-580 American Revolution 572-575 Thomas Jefferson 572, 574 Declaration of Independence 574 Articles of Confederation 573 American Bill of Rights 572-575 First Estate 575, 578 Second Estate 575, 578 Third Estate 575-579 National Assembly 578-580, 583 Tennis Court Oath 578-579 Declaration of Rights of Man and the Citizen 580-581 580-582 Georges Danton 584-585 Mountain 584-585 Girondins 584-585 Committee of Public Safety 585-588, 591-592 Reign of Terror 586-588, 591 Marie Antoinette 586  Robespierre 585, 589, 591, 592 Dechristianization 590-591 National Convention 584-585, 590-592
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Directory 592-593 Napoleon 592-600 Concordat 595 Civil Code 595 Grand Empire 597, 598m Elba 600 Waterloo 600 Duke of Wellington 600 Chapter 19 Mini Lecture  As the eighteenth century was coming to an end, the American War for Independence from  Britain was being fought.  This war followed several crises over taxation. It ended in victory for the  colonists and inspired other countries to want freedom. One of these was France. In fact, the  Americans won their war for independence largely because of financial and military aid from  European allies, especially France.  French soldiers had fought in the United States against the  British and they took democratic ideas back to their own country where society was grounded in  inequality of rights and a government reluctant to make reforms. France was also influenced by  the writings of the philosophes. The Declaration of Independence, adopted by the Second  Continental Congress in America, declared that the government receives its right to lead from the  governed and that citizens have a right to alter or abolish a government that they don't want. This  document borrowed heavily from the ideas of philosophes such as John Locke and was widely  read in Europe.  Yet the immediate cause of the French Revolution was the collapse of the government's finances  because of its failure to resolve its debts and other economic problems.  In addition to royal  extravagance and costly wars, the French suffered from a series of bad harvests and  unemployment caused by a manufacturing depression.  One way in which the French expressed  their frustration and anger was with the storming of the Bastille, an arsenal of ammunition and a  prison. The Estates General, governing body in France, faced a popular demand for a constitution. The  Third Estate, in an effort to achieve this, separated itself from the other two estates but was 
Background image of page 2
locked out of its meeting place. They adjourned themselves to meet at a tennis court where they 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

History II Test 2 - Chapter19StudyGuide 571603 Bastille...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online