Chapter 7 Film

Chapter 7 Film - Chapter 7 Movies and the Impact of Images...

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Chapter 7 Movies and the Impact of Images
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Early Technology and the Evolution of Movi es I. Social and economic forces, and inventions by known and unknown people, contributed to the development of movie technology. A. The Development of Film. The concept of film goes back as early as Leonardo daVinci. 1. Muybridge and Goodwin Make Pictures Move. By the late 1800s, a number of inventors worked on capturing moving images and projecting them. 2. Edison and the Lumières Create Motion Pictures. Thomas Edison developed the kinetograph and the kinetoscope. Meanwhile, Louis and August Lumière developed the cinematograph. Edison followed with the vitascope. B. The Introduction of Narrative. To become a mass medium, the early silent films had to offer what books achieved—the suspension of disbelief and narratives that engaged an audience’s imagination. C. The Arrival of Nickelodeons. Often managed by immigrants, nickelodeons required a minimal investment: just a secondhand projector and a large white sheet.
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1902: Frenchman Georges Méliès released A Trip to the Moon, a narrative motion picture that told a story. http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiDWmXHR3RQ 1903: Edwin W. Porter’s The Great Train Robbery used montage —tying together two separate but related shots in such a way that they took on new, unified meaning—to create an instant hit. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =fz7zNDZfwk0&feature=related
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1915: Writer, actor, and cameraman D. W. Griffith released The Birth of a Nation NAACP unsuccessfully fought the film in court and on the picket line. Lincoln Motion Picture Company and Micheaux Film and Book Company, black-run companies, founded to tell black stories to black audiences, and counter the depiction of blacks in The Birth of a Nation
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The Rise of the Hollywood Studio System By the late 1910s, the movie industry’s three basic economic divisions —production, distribution, and exhibition—had been established. A. Production. By the 1920s, film production had evolved into the studio system, which turned moviemaking into an assembly-line process, with stars, directors, editors, writers, and others working under exclusive contracts. B. Distribution. Production companies developed distribution techniques like block booking—pressuring theater operators to screen marginal films with no stars in order to have access to popular films with stars. C. Exhibition. Producers like Adolph Zukor conspired to dominate exhibition by owning the first-run theaters and attracted middle- and upper-class audiences with movie palaces.
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The Studio System’s Golden Age Film’s storytelling capabilities were enhanced by the addition of sound. A.
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Chapter 7 Film - Chapter 7 Movies and the Impact of Images...

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