Lecture 10 (10am) Chapter 6 (Thermodynamics) October 2 2009

Lecture 10 (10am) Chapter 6 (Thermodynamics) October 2 2009...

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Chapter 6 -- Thermodynamics Lecture 10 October 2, 2009
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Forms of Energy and Energy Transfer
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Units of Energy SI unit of energy is the Joule (J) 1J = 1kg∙m 2 /s 2 Other units of energy: calorie (cal) 1 cal = 4.184J BTU (British Thermal Unit) = 1055J Nutritional C alorie (with a capital C) 1 Calorie = 1 kcal (1000 calories) Both heat and work are expressed in Joules (or sometimes Kilojoules, kJ)
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A system which undergoes an adiabatic change (i.e., q = 0) and does work on the surroundings has A. w < 0, ΔE = 0 B. w > 0, ΔE > 0 C. w > 0, ΔE < 0 D. w < 0, ΔE > 0 E. w < 0, ΔE < 0
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Example: In a reaction, gaseous reactants form a liquid product. The heat absorbed by the surroundings is 20.8 kcal and the work done on the system is 16281J. What is the value of ∆E in kJ?
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Zeroeth Law of Thermodynamics “If two systems are in thermal equilibrium with a third system, they are also in thermal equilibrium with each other.”
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The Zeroeth Law of Thermodynamics proves we can define a temperature function , that is, we can construct a thermometer. We do this by calibrating a change in thermal property (such as the length
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Lecture 10 (10am) Chapter 6 (Thermodynamics) October 2 2009...

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