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front cover film 220 research - Farah Nader Gouda 900071674...

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Farah Nader Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 RESEARCH PAPER Name: Farah Nader Gouda ID: 900071674 Fall 2010 FLM 220 Research Paper on Monsieur Ibrahim Presented to Dr Houssam Elouan 1
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Farah Nader Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 RESEARCH PAPER Introduction Monsieur Ibrahim is a French movie that was produced by Lauret Petin and Michele Petin in 2003. The movie was starred mainly by Omar Sharif and Pierre Boulanger and it was directed by Francois Dupeyron. The movie is based on a novel and a play by Eric Emmanuel Schimmt . Detailed Plot In a street called Blue in a very poor neighborhood in Paris, Thirteen-year-old Momo (Pierre Boulanger) lives in genteel poverty with his morose father (Gilbert Melki), the unsuccessful attorney; the memory of his mother, who left when he was a baby, haunts them, and to make matters worse, dad keeps comparing him unfavorably to an older brother Momo can't remember. Despite his Cinderella existence (he even has to shop and cook for his ungrateful pere), Momo precociously discovers the pleasures of the pretty streetwalkers who line the rue Bleue. He pays for his first experience with Sylvie (Anne Suarez) by breaking open his piggy bank. His coming of age, which includes courting the freckled girl next door (Lola Naymark), is the freshest part of the film, synched to the irresistible energy of loud rock songs and happy hookers in the very Jewish rue Bleue. His father doesn't give him much money, and so to stretch what cash he does get his hands on Moïse regularly filches stuff from the grocers. Monsieur Ibrahim knows, but instead of confronting him eventually advises him how he might better makes his francs last (basically by substituting cheaper goods for Dad's wine, coffee, and food). Monsieur Ibrahim is known as "l'Arabe de la rue", the local Arab, but he's not, in fact, an Arab: he's from the Golden Crescent (Turkish, probably, or perhaps Persian). He is 2
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Farah Nader Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 RESEARCH PAPER a Muslim, but he's not averse to drinking some alcohol; in fact, he is a Sufi. The one book he relies on is the Koran, but his wisdom tends to be of the very worldly sort. Filling the void left by his unaffectionate father, Momo bonds with this local "Arab" shopkeeper, Monsieur Ibrahim (Sharif). An armchair philosopher whose Koranic wisdom stretches from "a smile will bring you happiness" to "paradise is open to everyone," the kind old man becomes a father to the boy, first metaphorically and then literally, when Momo's father dies. Ibrahim suggests that Momo consciously try to smile more since "smiling is what makes you happy." He tries it, and things seem to go more smoothly — except with his father who says that his teeth are crooked and that he needs braces. After Momo learns that Ibrahim is a Sufi, he looks up the term in a dictionary and discovers that it refers to an inner religion that is against legalism. The grocer advises him: "When you want to learn, you don't pick up a book, you talk to someone." The wisdom that he
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front cover film 220 research - Farah Nader Gouda 900071674...

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