3 iron review - Farah Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 REVIEW One...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Farah Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 REVIEW One of the movies that we saw in class and that I liked so much was 3-Iron movie that was directed by KI-Duk-Kim and starred by Seung-yeon-Lee. I like the fact that it was a somehow a silent movie, yet one can understand everything that happens . Human nature tells us that for our own well being, we must feel accepted. We must fit in to an identity; we must feel loved by the world that lies before us. If we fall short of either aspect, our mentality suffers. The smiles and general optimism that would be a regular reminder of our accepted lifestyle will have fleeted away from us and been replaced with grimaces laced with pessimism. Korean director Kim Ki-Duk explores into the depths of one's own identity in his fascinating film, 3-Iron . Tae-Suk has no home and very little money. All that he has to his name are the motorcycle he ran in on, a digital camera, and the clothes on his back. He plants brochures for Chinese food restaurants on people's doors and waits 24 hours before returning. If the brochure remains on the door knob, it indicates that its occupant is away. Tae then picks the lock, lets himself in, and lives in the house for one to two nights. He eats their food, uses their water, watches television, and cleans himself. In return, he fixes subtle aspects of the home. He washes stray clothes, he waters plants, he cleans the bathrooms; he repays the occupant back without them even knowing it. Before he departs, he makes sure to find a picture of the owner and their family and take a picture of himself standing next to it. He attempts to find a home for himself in the pictures of other families. One house is different from the rest. Tae lets himself in and goes through his regular routine. It is shown to the audience that this home belongs to an abusive husband and a battered wife. She curiously observes Tae as he bathes and changes clothes, careful Farah Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 REVIEW not to reveal herself and her wounds. Her husband calls on the phone every so often and she doesn't pick up. His frustration rages with every new call, "Answer the phone or I'll come home right now!" Frightened, she picks up the phone and screams into it. When she reveals herself to Tae, he finds a connection in her. Though he sprints from the scene, he eventually returns to observe her husband abusing her. Tae-Suk decides to rescue the woman, and the two set off on their own for the majority of the film....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/22/2011 for the course SOCI 122 taught by Professor Kamal during the Spring '11 term at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

Page1 / 6

3 iron review - Farah Gouda 900071674 FILM 220 REVIEW One...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online